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IOM Director General Visits Tripoli as Tragedy of Migrant Deaths at Sea Worsens

Ven, 03/24/2017 - 11:40
Language English

Switzerland - On 22 March, IOM Director General William Lacy Swing arrived in Tripoli, Libya, to meet with Libyan authorities and partners regarding the complex migration and displacement situation within the country. This important visit, sadly, was marred by continuing reports of tragedies at sea – including shipwrecks this week that may have taken as many as 240 lives.

“Libya, once a booming economy which many hopeful migrants viewed as a prized destination, is today a country beset by a grave security situation, a collapsing economy and virtually no service provision which is worsening an increasingly complex migration situation,” Ambassador Swing said upon arrival in Tripoli.

“As humanitarians, we can no longer turn our back on the communities affected by the current migration crisis in Libya. This is why IOM is enhancing its support to the most vulnerable people in the country – be they migrants or Libyans,” he continued.

Through his visit, Ambassador Swing sought to raise the profile of the magnitude of the needs of people in Libya, including migrants and Libyans impacted by the conflict and discuss with the Libyan authorities how IOM can strengthen its technical support to these communities within Libya.

Ambassador Swing met with the Chairman of the Presidential Council of the Government of National Accord, Fayes Al Sarraj, the Interior Minister of the Government of National Accord and officials from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Ambassador Swing also met with migrants at Triq Al Sekka  detention centre, where he also spoke to the Head of the Directorate for Combatting Illegal Migration, Ahmed Issa, about how IOM can continue to support the centre’s migrants through, for example, direct assistance, infrastructure development and voluntary humanitarian return.

IOM Libya this week released new findings from its Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM), reporting an estimated 303,608 internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Libya, a majority of whom have been displaced from areas in the north-east and north-west of the country, particularly in Sirte and some parts of Benghazi.

Displaced Libyans are suffering from a lack of access to essential services, including critical medical assistance, and to economic opportunities. IOM works with local government and communities to promote stability and development for IDPs, migrants and local host communities in Libya, as well as to help establish a better system of managing the migration situation on the ground.

Economic prosperity pre-2011, porous borders and the complex realities of the political and economic situation in Libya and other regional countries have seen Libya hosting various mixed migration flows, consisting of forced migrants, labour migrants, migrants seeking onward travel to Europe and migrants who are long term residents of the country.

It is estimated that between 700,000 to 1 million migrants have remained in Libya despite the insecurity they face.

Due to the situation in the country, many migrants are turning to IOM to help them return home. This week, IOM has assisted stranded migrants to return home to both Nigeria and Cote d’Ivoire from Tripoli. IOM has helped 13,691 migrants get home to safety since 2011.

Increased support to voluntary humanitarian return is essential to improving migration management, and a long-term commitment to forging links between effective reintegration schemes, stability and local development potential in communities of return is of vital importance.

On 21 March, IOM helped 151 stranded Ivorian migrants – 131 men and 20 women – return home from Libya. Two days later (23 March), a charter flight assisted another 155 stranded Nigerians – 73 women and 82 men – to go return to Nigeria.

The two charters were coordinated with Libyan, Nigerian and Ivorian authorities and departed from Tripoli’s Mitiga Airport. IOM provided pre-departure interviews, medical check-ups and material assistance, including clothes and shoes.

Among the Ivorian passengers was 17-year-old Emmanuel,* who crossed four countries with his sisters and two brothers to reach Libya. Once there, his brothers managed to reach Europe, but left him because they were unable to afford his travel expenses.

Emmanuel ultimately decided to enter a detention centre – where he felt safer than remaining on the street – and where he could eat and sleep until he received IOM's voluntary return assistance to return to Cote d’Ivoire.

Adama* suffered from difficult circumstances in Cote d’Ivoire and decided to leave his family and school to go to Libya. On the way, he was kidnapped, beaten and tortured as his kidnappers asked for a ransom from his family. After his release, he went to Tripoli and planned to cross the sea to Europe but things went wrong and he decided to return home with IOM assistance.

Among the 23 passengers on the Ivorian flight that received reintegration assistance, four unaccompanied male minors received family tracing assistance.

The 16 most vulnerable cases on the Nigerian flight were also eligible for reintegration support, which will give them the opportunity to start a small business or to continue their education.

One unaccompanied child and two passengers received medical assistance before being deemed fit to travel. Sixteen migrants from the Nigerian group were considered eligible for IOM’s reintegration assistance upon arrival in Nigeria.

The return assistance was funded by the European Union, the Governments of the Netherlands and of the United Kingdom. It was part of IOM’s return assistance programme.

So far in 2017, IOM Libya has helped 1,566 stranded migrants return to their countries of origin. Of these, 337 were eligible for reintegration assistance.

*All migrant names have been altered for security reasons.

For further information, please contact Leonard Doyle, Tel: +41 79 2857123, Email:  ldoyle@iom.int or Othman Belbeisi, Tel: +216 29 600389, Email: obelbeisi@iom.int

Posted: Friday, March 24, 2017 - 18:05Image: Region-Country: Europe and Central AsiaSwitzerlandDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 25,170, Deaths: 559

Ven, 03/24/2017 - 11:36
Language English

Switzerland - IOM reports that 25,170 migrants and refugees entered Europe by sea in 2017 through 22 March, with over 80 percent arriving in Italy and the rest in Spain and Greece. This compares with 163,273 through the first 82 days of 2016.

IOM Rome spokesman Flavio Di Giacomo said Thursday between 20 and 22 March, 4,380 migrants arrived in Italy by sea. On 23 March another 1,200 migrants who were rescued in recent days also were brought to land. They are not yet included in the 20,674 total arrivals figure compiled by Italy’s Ministry of Interior to date. The main nationalities included with these 1,200 additional arrivals are Nigerian, Gambian, Ivorian, Ghanaian, Malian, Senegalese and Guinean (both Guinea-Bissau and Conakry).

Di Giacomo further reported that on Thursday the NGO Proactiva Open Arms retrieved the remains of five migrants from a capsized dinghy. These five deaths are not included in the 559 Mediterranean migrant and refugee fatalities recorded by IOM’s Missing Migrants Project through March 22.

Also, IOM Libya’s Christine Petré reported Thursday that on Tuesday (21 March) local fishermen rescued 54 migrants – 50 men, four women) off Zuwarah. An estimated 120 people were on board a rubber boat, she reported, and that the remains of two male migrants were retrieved on shore.  IOM Libya reports the total number of migrants rescued in Libyan water in 2017 is 3,457. Total known fatalities: 163

Last year at this time IOM recorded 554 Mediterranean fatalities, two thirds of those occurring off Greece in the Eastern Mediterranean. In 2017 so far only two fatalities have been recorded on this route. By contrast, nearly 560 of this year’s reported deaths have occurred on the routes to Italy and Spain – or about three times the combined 188 fatalities recorded on these two routes in 2016.

Worldwide, Missing Migrants reports fatalities on this date top 1,050 (see chart, below), with the Mediterranean region accounting for the largest proportion of deaths – over half of the global total.  As of March 23, Missing Migrants Project has recorded 20,157 migrant deaths since the start of 2014 – or over 20,000 migrant deaths recorded in just over three years.

“This figure is especially troubling, considering that Missing Migrants Project data is a minimum estimate of the real number of deaths during migration worldwide, and it is likely that many more deaths go unrecorded,” said Julia Black of IOM’s GMDAC unit in Berlin, which compiles the Missing Migrants database.

Global totals table of MMP data for 1 Jan – 20 March 2016 and 2017

For the latest Mediterranean Update infographic:
http://migration.iom.int/docs/MMP/170324_Mediterranean_Update.pdf

For latest arrivals and fatalities in the Mediterranean, please visit: http://migration.iom.int/europe

Learn more about the Missing Migrants Project at: http://missingmigrants.iom.int

For further information please contact:
Joel Millman at IOM Geneva, Tel: +41.79.103 8720, Email: jmillman@iom.int
Flavio Di Giacomo at IOM Italy, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int
Sabine Schneider at IOM Germany, Tel: +49 30 278 778 17 Email: sschneider@iom.int
IOM Yemen, Saba Malme, Sana’a, Tel : + 967 736 800 329 (mobile), Email: smalme@iom.int
IOM Greece: Daniel Esdras, Tel: +30 210 9912174, Email: iomathens@iom.int or Kelly Namia, Tel: +30 210 9919040, +30 210 9912174, Email: knamia@iom.int
Julia Black at IOM GMDAC, Tel: +49 30 278 778 27, Email: jblack@iom.int
Abby Dwommoh, IOM Turkey; Tel. (Direct): +90 (0)312 454 3048, Mobile: +90 (533) 698 7285, Email: adwommoh@iom.int, or Mazen Aboulhosn, Tel: +9031245-51202, Email: maboulhosn@iom.int
IOM Libya: Othman Belbeisi, Tel: +216 29 600389, Email: obelbeisi@iom.int  or Christine Petré, Tel. (Direct):  +216 29 240 448, Email: chpetre@iom.int
Hicham Hasnaoui at IOM Morocco, Tel: + 212 5 37 65 28 81, Email: hhasnaoui@iom.int

For information or interview requests in French:
Florence Kim, IOM Geneva, Tel: +41 79 103 03 42, Email: fkim@iom.int
Flavio Di Giacomo, IOM Italy, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int

Posted: Friday, March 24, 2017 - 18:03Image: Region-Country: Europe and Central AsiaSwitzerlandDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

IOM Renews Calls to “Unite to End TB”

Ven, 03/24/2017 - 11:36
Language English

Switzerland - This World TB Day (24/03), IOM reiterates the call for proactive national and international multi-sectoral cooperation, in order to reach tuberculosis targets set out by the World Health Organization (WHO) End TB Strategy and by the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

Although it is curable, tuberculosis remains one of the world’s top health challenges, with more than 2.4 billion people infected – or a third of the world’s population. Diagnostic delays, the lack of access to TB services, discrimination associated with TB infection and poor continuity of care services are among the significant causes for tuberculosis and migration challenges in several parts of the world.

“As a member of the Stop TB Partnership, IOM supports the call to ‘Unite to End TB’,” said Dr. Davide Mosca, Director of the IOM Migration Health Division. “In view of the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration and ahead of the UN General Assembly High-Level Meeting on TB planned for 2018, it is important to advocate for sustainable solutions to end TB through a collaborative, migrant-centred and multi-sectoral approach.”

Over the years, with support from donors including the Global Fund and the Stop TB Partnership, IOM has implemented TB prevention, treatment and care services for the most vulnerable migrant and mobile populations and those living in hard to reach areas, in close collaboration with National TB programmes, other UN partners, civil society actors and migrant communities themselves.

“IOM remains committed to working around the world to address the needs of migrants, especially in the provision of TB diagnostic, treatment and care services,” added Dr. Mosca.

Recent examples of such programmes can be observed in Tajikistan, where IOM implements TB projects to improve health-seeking behaviour among migrants before departure and upon return. This is done by raising awareness, building the support of the government and other key partners to ensure access to TB care for migrants, enacting referral mechanisms, active TB case detection and decreasing TB treatment incompliance by providing treatment adherence support.

Similarly, in Jordan and Lebanon, IOM has been working on enhancing tuberculosis prevention, diagnosis and treatment to reduce tuberculosis transmission, morbidity, and mortality among Syrian refugees and migrants, through targeted mechanisms for preventing disruptions and ensuring sustained delivery of health services.

For more information, please visit Human Mobility and Tuberculosis.

For further information please contact Dr. Poonam Dhavan, IOM HQ, Tel: +41797010971 Email: pdhavan@iom.int, or Manuela Altomonte Tel: +41 227179293, Email: maltomonte@iom.int

Posted: Friday, March 24, 2017 - 18:02Image: Region-Country: Europe and Central AsiaSwitzerlandDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

IOM Supports New Employment Integration Programme in Tunisia

Ven, 03/24/2017 - 11:36
Language English

Tunisia - IOM Deputy Director General, Laura Thompson, CEO of ”La Caixa” Banking Foundation, Jaume Giró and the CEO of the Tunisian banking organization Caisse des Dépôts et Consignations, Dr. Boutheina Ben Yaghlane Ben Slimane, signed an agreement today (24/03) to launch “La Caixa” Foundation’s Incorpora programme in Tunis. This employment integration programme aims to find jobs for members of groups with particular difficulties integrating into employment.

This agreement will enable the implementation of the Incorpora programme in the Tunisian capital and its metropolitan area, which has a total population of over two million people and high unemployment rates. The programme is focused on people in vulnerable situations, mainly women and young people at risk of exclusion. IOM will be the project coordinating partner on the ground, working with local organizations in pursuit of the programme’s goals.

The project is launched under the guidance of MED Confederation, an association which promotes social and economic cooperation among Mediterranean countries. “La Caixa” Foundation, Caisse des Dépôts et Consignations of Tunisia, the World Savings Bank Institute, Caisse de Dépôts et Gestion of Morocco, IEMed, IPEMED and the Al Barid Bank of Morocco are all founding members of the confederation.

The Incorpora model has been trialled in Morocco, Hungary and Poland. In 2016, the programme, launched in Spain ten years ago, helped 28,000 people find jobs locally. Cooperation between the social and business sectors is enabled by 382 organizations that run the programme in all the Spanish provinces, thanks to the efforts of 756 workers devoted to integration and employment. Last year alone, 9,000 companies engaged with this programme.

Further information, please contact Lorena Lando at IOM Tunisia, Tel: +216 28 54 29 54, Email:  llando@iom.int  

Or Irene Benedicto at ”La Caixa” Foundation, Tel: +34 629 54 78 50, Email: ibenedicto@fundaciolacaixa.org

Posted: Friday, March 24, 2017 - 18:01Image: Region-Country: Africa and Middle EastTunisiaDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

IOM: Humanitarian Agencies Prepare for Increased Displacement of Drought-Affected Somalis into Ethiopia

Ven, 03/24/2017 - 11:36
Language English

Ethiopia - As severe food insecurity continues to rise due to the worsening drought, thousands of Somalis are being forced to leave their homes in search of water, food and pasture. The Government of Ethiopia and the humanitarian community are planning for the potential arrival of 50,000 Somalis in the border regions of Ethiopia. These individuals will require urgent humanitarian assistance.

Somalia is currently experiencing a drought, which could lead to famine – only six years after a devastating famine killed nearly 260,000 people in 2011. Humanitarian agencies estimate that there are 6.2 million drought-affected Somalis in need of assistance, including food, water, sanitation services, healthcare, nutrition, protection and shelter. While needs are widespread, areas with little humanitarian access such as Bay and Bakool are especially affected, as many are forced to walk for days seeking assistance, food and water.

“We have received news of Somalis arriving at the Ethiopian border extremely distressed and malnourished,” said Gerry Waite, IOM Somalia Chief of Mission.

IOM is scaling up lifesaving operations along the drought-stricken Ethiopia-Somalia border, where thousands are at risk of disease and death. Thus far in 2017, IOM Ethiopia has transported over 4,000 Somalis from border entry points to displacement camps in Dollo Ado, where they are received and given access to lifesaving services. IOM and humanitarian partners continue to seek resources to support the emergency shelter needs of drought-displaced families.

“IOM remains ready to assist vulnerable individuals crossing the Somalia-Ethiopia border, and appeals to the donor community for their support in helping people forced from their homes by drought,” said Maureen Achieng, IOM Ethiopia Chief of Mission.

Drought is also affecting Ethiopia – low rainfall is predicted for the southern, eastern and north-eastern parts of the country. The Humanitarian Requirement Document 2017, produced jointly by the Government of Ethiopia and humanitarian partners, estimates a total of 376,000 internally displaced persons as a result of the drought. Initial projections of displacement figures are now expected to be much higher due to the severity of the drought. IOM Ethiopia’s Displacement Tracking Matrix has identified over 126,000 individuals internally displaced as a result of the drought since the beginning of 2017.

IOM recently launched its 2017 Somalia Drought Appeal. It was developed to enhance current response, and expand the UN Migration Agency’s geographic footprint within the country to help those most affected by the drought. IOM teams on the ground are rapidly scaling up ongoing interventions in the fields of health, shelter, water and sanitation, protection and food security.

IOM is also increasing its displacement tracking capacity in Somalia and Ethiopia to allow for real time updates to better inform humanitarian response and planning. The activities presented in the Somalia Drought Appeal include and build on the 2017 Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP) and UN OCHA’s Pre-Famine Operational Plan (January-June 2017), that target the country’s most critical lifesaving needs.

Download the Appeal here:

https://www.iom.int/sites/default/files/country_appeal/file/IOM-Appeal_S...

For further information, please contact IOM Somalia, Sanyu Osire, Tel: +254 705 832 020, Email: mosire@iom.int and at IOM Ethiopia, Martin Wyndham, Tel: +251 930 411 225, Email: mwyndham@iom.int

Posted: Friday, March 24, 2017 - 18:00Image: Region-Country: Africa and Middle EastEthiopiaDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

USD 2 Million Sought to Provide Humanitarian Assistance to Persons Affected by Cyclone Enawo in Madagascar

Ven, 03/24/2017 - 11:35
Language English

Madagascar - Tropical Cyclone Enawo, the first of the cyclonic season – and the strongest of the last 13 years –  made landfall on the north-eastern coast of Madagascar on the morning of 7 March 2017 and crossed the island to its southern end, causing havoc across the country.

The cyclone’s impact has resulted in humanitarian needs concentrated in the north-east of the country. As of 20 March, the national Disaster Risk Management Authority reported 433,985 persons directly affected, a total of 247,219 persons having been displaced, 40,520 houses destroyed, 250 injured, 81 fatalities and 18 persons missing.

About 96 percent of the reported houses destroyed are concentrated in the SAVA and Analanjirofo regions. While displaced persons in those regions have mostly left the displacement sites and started to rebuild their houses, the majority of affected households do not have the means to conduct and sustain the emergency shelter repairs needed.

As of 20 March, 5,293 persons still remained displaced in communal sites. While the caseload (which peaked on 14 March at 79,586 persons displaced in some 220-plus mostly communal sites) significantly dropped in recent days, many displaced individuals are still unable to return to their villages of origin as their houses have been totally destroyed or are still affected by the flooding. They had to leave their areas of origin with very few belongings and now find themselves with very limited capacity to recover by their own means.

The IOM appeal for USD 2.08 million will cover the emergency needs of the remaining 5,293 displaced persons and emergency shelter support to 6,000 most affected households in the regions of SAVA and Analanjirofo. IOM, in coordination with humanitarian stakeholders and partners in Madagascar, proposes to provide targeted displacement monitoring and displacement sites management and coordination support; as well as robust emergency shelter packages, and technical assistance for safer construction.

Daniel Silva y Poveda, IOM Madagascar Head of Office, underlined that, “Although the cyclone caused less damage than initially expected, the capacity to track the needs of the residual displaced populations, to coordinate and manage displacement sites remains inconsistent. This can lead to unnecessary prolonged displacement and increased vulnerability to forms of abuse and exploitation, including trafficking in persons. Adequate safe temporary shelter is critical to ensure the safety, health, dignity and well-being of people.”

He added that, “For those families that have returned to their damaged or destroyed homes and have started to put the pieces back together, the vulnerability of these affected households will remain high and hamper their capacity to recover, if emergency shelter support is not provided.”

The Madagascar March 2017 Flash Appeal can be found here.

For further information, please contact Daniel Silva y Poveda at IOM Madagascar, Tel: +261.325654954, Email: dsilva@iom.int

Posted: Friday, March 24, 2017 - 17:59Image: Region-Country: Africa and Middle EastMadagascarDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

IOM Ethiopia Supports Displaced Families in Gambella

Ven, 03/24/2017 - 11:35
Language English

Ethiopia - In coordination with the Gambella Regional Disaster Prevention and Food Security Agency (DPFSA), IOM has supported 332 vulnerable displaced households with the distribution of critical shelter, cash and non-food items (NFIs) to meet their most basic needs.

Recent inter-ethnic attacks in border areas of Ethiopia’s Gambella Region has caused the affected families to flee their homes. According to the displaced families, their villages were attacked by perpetrators who stole cattle, kidnapped children and burned houses.

“These individuals fled the ensuing violence with nothing and they are too frightened to return to their villages. They remain extremely vulnerable and in need of urgent humanitarian assistance,” said Miriam Mutalu, IOM Ethiopia’s Head of the Sub-Office in Gambella.

The pilot cash/voucher component of the distribution was carried out from 13 to 14 March and engaged the existing local market, thereby contributing to the local economy of the host community. In coordination with the local supplier, displaced households were provided with vouchers for 15 non-food items including a jerry can, washing basin, and soap in addition to other items.

IOM also procured and distributed tarpaulins to the displaced households to meet their most urgent shelter needs and provided 1,200 Ethiopian Birr (USD 52) in cash per household for families to spend on additional household necessities.

The provision of cash was supported by the Ethiopian Postal Service, which previously participated in IOM training on the use of cash transfers as an innovative way to address the needs of internally displaced persons (IDPs). Providing cash to IDPs increases the flexibility of assistance and allows for displaced households to prioritize their own requirements.

Nyadeil, a 46-year-old mother of seven, is among those displaced from Luel for fear of further attacks. “This is the second time that we have been displaced in fear of another attack. My children were in school and we had livestock before we were displaced.” Now Nyadeil and her family have nothing and she is very thankful for the assistance. “We will use the plastic sheets to build a shelter and buy some milk with some of the money we received,” she said.

In discussions with the local authorities and displaced households, IOM distributed the vouchers, shelter materials and cash to the women in the households to mitigate potential misuse of resources, ensure that provision of assistance reaches children, and to engage women in the management of household assets. The provision of cash, shelter and NFIs is supported by the Ethiopian Humanitarian Fund (EHF).

IOM will continue working in close coordination with the DPFSA to ensure that the urgent needs of the displaced households are met without delay.

For further information, please contact IOM Ethiopia, Miriam Mutalu at Tel: +251 946 69 25 01, Email: mmutalu@iom.int

Posted: Friday, March 24, 2017 - 17:58Image: Region-Country: Africa and Middle EastEthiopiaDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

IOM Trains Egyptian Officials on Labour Market Forecasting

Ven, 03/24/2017 - 11:35
Language English

Egypt - IOM this week (19/03) launched the second in a series of trainings on migration data collection and analysis at Egypt’s Central Agency for Public Mobilization and Statistics (CAPMAS).

The 10-day training on Building Labour Market and Demographic Scenarios for Egypt and the European Union is being attended by 12 CAPMAS representatives and aims at enhancing the Government of Egypt’s capacities to develop evidence-based policies on labour migration. It builds on the knowledge gained from the first training on “Labour Market Forecasting” delivered by IOM Egypt in November 2016, equipping participants with the skills to better analyse labour market dynamics in Egypt and abroad.

The training will conclude with finalization of a report analysing the labour market in Egypt and potential countries of destination for labour mobility. This report is also intended to inform policymakers in Egypt about those destination countries with regular labour migration opportunities.

“This training is providing us with the economical and statistical tools to analyse the labour market in Egypt and in select countries in the European Union to forecast future needs, demographically and economically. This will enable us to identify potential opportunities for labour mobility of Egyptians abroad and support evidence-based planning in Egypt,” explained Madiha Soliman, Senior Researcher at CAPMAS.

Between 2010 and 2100 Europe’s population is projected to decline by more than 100 million (13.7 percent). According to Eurostat calculations, the region’s old age/dependency ratio – the percentage of non-working over 65-year-olds dependent on those of active working age – will nearly double to 1.9 workers per retiree by 2060, from 3.7 in 2012. This indicates an “increasing burden to provide for social expenditure related to population aging (for example, for pensions, healthcare and institutional care),” according to a recent report.

Conversely, countries in the Middle East and North Africa experience high youth unemployment as a result of booming fertility rates. In Egypt, every year approximately 550,000 new Egyptian workers join an already-saturated labour market, many of whom join the ranks of the 3.6 million unemployed. The demographic transitions in these countries could be addressed by promoting a common understanding on how labour market needs on both sides of the Mediterranean can be aligned in order to plan and manage successful labour migration for the benefit of all.

Accordingly, the training responds to the challenges mentioned above and is reflective of the Egyptian Government’s priorities, as outlined in the National Strategy on Combating Irregular Migration for 2016-2026 and the Action Plan on Institutional Strengthening in the Area of Labour Migration, to provide regular migration channels for Egyptians, specifically through monitoring and analysing local and international labour markets to identify current and future opportunities for labour mobility of Egyptians as a means to curb irregular migration.

This intervention is part of the “Developing Capacities for Forecasting and Planning Migration across the Mediterranean” project funded by IOM’s Development Fund and implemented by IOM Egypt.

For further information, please contact Dr. Teuta Grazhdani at IOM Egypt. Tel: +202-27365140, Email: iomegypt@iom.int

Posted: Friday, March 24, 2017 - 17:57Image: Region-Country: Africa and Middle EastEgyptDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

IOM Egypt, Embassy of Philippines Hold Health Awareness-Raising Event in Cairo

Ven, 03/24/2017 - 11:35
Language English

Egypt - IOM Egypt and the Embassy of the Philippines in Cairo recently held (17/03) a health awareness-raising event for approximately 100 Filipina women migrants and their children.

Throughout the day, participants received paediatric consultations and screening for diabetes through rapid checks facilitated by IOM physicians. In addition, the migrant women received various items to meet their needs for dignified care including basic hygiene items and sanitary protection.

In this context, migrants also received information about the risk factors of forced labour when assuming new work.

“Migrants are often unaware of the dangers of forced labour when they start working abroad. Knowing the factors that increase the risks for exploitation and abuse is crucial to prevent this crime from happening,” explained IOM Egypt caseworker Abdoul-Roufou Ousmane.

The event is the second held in cooperation with the Embassy of Philippines. The first was in August 2016 and covered two main health topics: cervical and breast cancer, and Hepatitis B and C with the ultimate aim of raising women’s awareness of predisposing factors, means of prevention, diagnosis and the importance of having regular medical check-ups.

This event complemented IOM’s month-long activities in celebration of International Women’s Day, which began on 8 March with the distribution of dignity kits to women. They were also encouraged to register for yesterday's event (23/03) offering medical consultations and referrals for free cervical and breast cancer checks.

For further information, please contact Dr. Heidi Goubran at IOM Egypt. Tel: +202-27365140, Email: iomegypt@iom.int

Posted: Friday, March 24, 2017 - 17:56Image: Region-Country: Africa and Middle EastEgyptDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

Chilean Mayors’ US Study Visit Focuses on Migrants’ Social Inclusion

Ven, 03/24/2017 - 11:35
Language English

Chile - This week, three Chilean mayors are in the United States as part of the State Department’s International Visiting Leaders Program (IVLP), during which they will exchange best practices for migrants’ social inclusion. IVLP’s objective is to share first-hand knowledge of society, culture and politics in the United States, connecting foreign leaders with their US counterparts.

IOM Chile representatives are taking part in the study visit, as part of the mission’s work with local governments under the Migrants and Cities programme.

The exchange – organized by the US Embassy in Chile – in which mayors Rodrigo Delgado (municipality of Estación Central); Juan Carrasco (Quilicura); and Daniel Jadue (Recoleta) are participating, is taking place in Houston, Texas and Providence, Rhode Island.

The Chilean mayors are expected to learn about Houston and Providence’s experiences of creating local policies conducive for migrants’ social inclusion. They will also discuss the progress and challenges related to their local initiatives in Chile around themes such as migrant health, education and access to employment.

The exchange of best practice tips will support and strengthen municipal efforts to improve migrants’ self-sufficiency and integration, and reinforce public policy for social inclusion in the country.

“We are convinced that migrants are great contributors and we are developing a series of migration policies, such as creating the Multicultural Office, where we offer legal, social, educational and economic support with job training and workshops,” explained Mayor Delgado. “Those are some of the good practices that we are sharing.”

Norberto Girón, IOM Chile Chief of Mission, explained that “this exchange of good practices on social inclusion will help the mayors understand other migration realities and give them ideas to better support the integration and social inclusion of migrants.”

According to the National Socioeconomic Characterization Survey of 2015, from the Ministry of Social Development, migrants represent 2.7 percent of Chile’s total population. Of this figure, 69.1 percent are concentrated in the Metropolitan Region, reaching 4.6 percent of the regional population. According to the Municipalities of Recoleta and Estación Central, the estimated migrant population is 11.8 percent and 4.7 percent respectively. The migrants are mostly from Peru, Bolivia, Colombia, Haiti, Ecuador and Venezuela.

For further information please contact Fernando Thumm at IOM Chile, Tel. +56 02 9633710, Email: fthumm@iom.int

Posted: Friday, March 24, 2017 - 17:55Image: Region-Country: AmericaChileDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

We Must 'Unite to End TB'- IOM

Gio, 03/23/2017 - 09:50
Language English

Switzerland - On World TB Day 2017, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) joins the Stop TB Partnership, the World Health Organization (WHO) and other key partners in redoubling efforts to increase public awareness of tuberculosis and its impact on vulnerable populations such as migrants.

Although tuberculosis is a curable disease, according to the WHO’s Global TB Report 2016, it remains the world’s leading infectious killer disease, with more deaths every year than HIV/AIDS or malaria. Moreover, it leads to stigmatization and discrimination practices in many countries, further reducing opportunities for key populations, including migrants, to access care and prevention services.

The UN General Assembly in September 2016 saw world leaders agreeing on the development of a Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration, as well as a Global Compact for Refugees. In this context, the health of all migrants is one of the major concerns that need to be addressed by governments and the international community through the promotion of migrants’ access to health and the respect of their human rights, as well as recognition of the positive contributions made by migrants to sustainable development.

On World TB Day 2017, IOM calls for a more proactive international cooperation and approach to eradicate tuberculosis by 2030, as set by the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

In May 2014, the 67th World Health Assembly (WHA) adopted the new End TB Strategy and targets. This strategy aims to end the global TB epidemic by 2035 by setting specific benchmarks and targets. It builds on a “know your epidemic” approach and focuses particularly on serving the most vulnerable and marginalized populations.

To further address and pursue the elimination of tuberculosis, WHO and IOM have developed recommendations on adaptation of the End TB Strategy to specifically address the needs of migrants and mobile populations.

Every day, IOM Missions around the world implement dedicated programmes and initiatives to fight TB, support vulnerable populations in their access to health services and advocate governments and other stakeholders for more migrant-inclusive health policies.

The path towards a world without TB will lead to a UN General Assembly High-Level Meeting on TB in 2018.

Together with our partners, we call for international and coordination action on 24 March 2017 and beyond to ensure that we eradicate TB.

We must “Unite to End TB” because TB knows no borders and we must “Leave No One Behind”.

Posted: Thursday, March 23, 2017 - 16:43Image: Region-Country: Europe and Central AsiaSwitzerlandDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

IOM Director General Visits Tripoli as Crisis Worsens for Libyans and Vulnerable Migrants

Mer, 03/22/2017 - 03:56
Language English

Libya - Today (22/03), IOM Director General William Lacy Swing arrived in Tripoli, Libya, to meet with Libyan authorities regarding the complex migration and displacement situation within the country.

“Libya, once a booming economy which many hopeful migrants viewed as a prized destination, is today a country beset by a grave security situation, a collapsing economy and virtually no service provision which is worsening an increasingly complex migration situation,” Ambassador Swing said upon arrival in Tripoli.

“As humanitarians, we can no longer turn our back on the communities affected by the current migration crisis in Libya. This is why IOM is enhancing its support to the most vulnerable people in the country – be they migrants or Libyans.” 

Through his visit, Ambassador Swing aims to raise the profile of the magnitude of the needs of people in Libya, including migrants and Libyans impacted by the conflict and discuss with the Libyan authorities how IOM can strengthen its technical support to these communities within Libya.

Ambassador Swing will meet with the Interior Minister of the Government of National Accord, Alaref Al Khoja and the Chairman of the Presidential Council of the Government of National Accord, Fayes Al Sarraj.

There are different migratory flows moving through and towards Libya, driven by underdevelopment, state fragility, marginalization and security threats in West Africa, East Africa and the Middle East. The migration situation is compounded by political insecurity and conflict in Libya, which is further exacerbating existing vulnerabilities of all affected communities in the country, including Libyans themselves. Fostering a stable environment to bring about a much-needed holistic approach to migration governance is now a priority.  

There are an estimated 303,608 internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Libya, according to IOM’s Displacement Tracking Matrix. A majority have been displaced from areas in the north-east and north-west of the country, particularly in Sirte and some parts of Benghazi. Displaced Libyans are suffering from a lack of access to essential services, including critical medical assistance, and economy opportunities. IOM works with local government and communities to promote stability and development for IDPs, migrants and local host communities in Libya, as well as to help establish a better system of managing the migration situation on the ground.

Economic prosperity pre-2011, porous borders, and the complex realities of the political and economic situation in Libya and other regional countries have seen Libya hosting various mixed migration flows, consisting of forced migrants, labour migrants, migrants seeking onwards travel to Europe and migrants who are long term residents of the country. It is estimated that between 700,000 to 1 million migrants have remained in Libya despite the insecurity they face.

Ambassador Swing will also meet with migrants at Triq Al Sekka  detention centre, where he will speak to Head of the Directorate for Combatting Illegal Migration, Ahmed Issa, about how IOM can continue to support the centre’s migrants through, for example, direct assistance, infrastructure development and voluntary humanitarian return.

Due to the situation in the country, many migrants are turning to IOM to help them get home. Yesterday, IOM helped 160 stranded migrants return home to Cote d'Ivoire from Tripoli. IOM has helped 13,691 migrants get home to safety since 2011.

Increased support to voluntary humanitarian return is essential to improving migration management, and a long-term commitment to forging links between effective reintegration schemes, stability and local development potential in communities of return is of vital importance.

IOM is launching an Action Plan for Libya to work with the Libyan authorities to address the many challenges faced by migrants, IDPs, returnees and the affected Libyan population. The approach is grounded in two key objectives, which are to urgently provide humanitarian assistance and protection to affected populations in Libya and contribute to stability, build capacities and resilience of Libyan authorities, as well as crisis affected populations themselves.

For further information, please contact Leonard Doyle, Tel: +41 79 2857123, Email:  ldoyle@iom.int , Othman Belbeisi, Tel: +216 29 600389, Email: obelbeisi@iom.int, or Christine Petré in IOM Libya, Tel: +216 29 240 448, Email: chpetre@iom.int

Posted: Wednesday, March 22, 2017 - 10:55Image: Region-Country: Africa and Middle EastLibyaThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

70 Musicians from 20 Countries in Geneva Fundraising Concert for Migrants in Greece

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 10:35
Language English

Switzerland - This Saturday (25/03) the United Nations Orchestra will play a concert at the Victoria Hall in Geneva, Switzerland. All proceeds from ticket sales will be used to facilitate the psychosocial activities carried out by IOM.

Psychosocial support, such as music therapy, will be provided to migrants affected by the Mediterranean migration crisis – particularly women and children.

The United Nations Orchestra was established with the goal of using symphonic music to support humanitarian efforts, by organizing cultural events to raise funds for humanitarian organizations such as IOM. 

With 70 musicians hailing from 20 different countries, the UN Orchestra is emblematic of the diversity of global migration as well as the universality of music. This benefit concert will contribute to IOM’s aim to promote, protect and support the wellbeing of crisis-affected migrant sending and hosting populations.

Every day, hundreds of people fleeing war and instability in their home countries attempt the perilous journey across the Mediterranean Sea. The shores of Greece have thus become a landing point for migrants in Europe.

“We have several unbroken conflicts from West Africa to Asia and none of them show any signs of resolution anytime soon,” said IOM Director General William Lacy Swing. “The needs of the people are going to be enormous and we have to assist them.”

People have long moved in search of safety and better opportunities for their families. Today, however, conflict, economic instability and climate change fallout are driving millions of men, women and children out of their countries and communities under duress.

Over the past decade, the number of refugees, irregular migrants and asylum seekers arriving in Greece by boat has increased significantly, but a big shift in crossings from the sea to the land border has been observed since 2010 owing to large influxes of migrants from Asia and Africa, who view Greece as a gateway to the European Union.

The stressors connected with the reasons for leaving, the dangerous and undignified conditions of travel, faulty reception systems in transit and destination countries, and the stigma migrants are subject to all combine to threaten the emotional wellbeing of migrants.

“We aim to promote, protect and support the wellbeing of crisis affected populations,” continued Ambassador Swing. “The funds raised from this concert will help develop a music therapy pilot project for migrants in Greece.”

Through consultations with music therapy experts, IOM’s music therapy program hopes to assist migrants by reducing stress and providing a healthy outlet for their emotions. The project will be tested in Greece, and then further improved and developed for migrants in other European countries.

Tickets are available online at http://bit.ly/2lqXRQo for 20 - 80 CHF.

For further information, please contact Florence Kim at IOM HQ, Tel: +41791030342, Email: fkim@iom.int  

 

Posted: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 - 17:29Image: Region-Country: Europe and Central AsiaSwitzerlandThemes: IOMOthersDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 20,484, Deaths: 525

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 10:29
Language English

Switzerland - IOM reports that 20,484 migrants and refugees entered Europe by sea in 2017 through 19 March, with over 80 percent arriving in Italy and the rest in Spain and Greece. This compares with 160,331 through the first 79 days of 2016.

These arrival numbers do not include 3,312 migrants rescued on 19 March and who are being brought to Italy over the next few days, according to updates from Italy’s Ministry of Interior. Those new arrivals would push this year’s Mediterranean arrival numbers to slightly under 20,000 for Italy alone. That puts 2017’s arrival rate to Italy considerably ahead of the 2015’s first three-month total of 10,165, and ahead of the 2016 three-month total of 18,777 (see chart below).

  Arrivals by sea to Italy
January - December 2015/2016
(source: Italian MoI)  

2016

2015

January

5,273

3,528

February

3,828

4,354

March

9,676

2,283

April

9,149

16,056

May

19,925

21,231

June

22,371

22,877

July

23,552

23,210

August

21,294

22,610

September

16,975

15,922

October

27,384

8,916

November

13,962

3,219

December

8,047

9,636

IOM’s Missing Migrants Project reports 525 Mediterranean deaths, short of the 553 reported during the same period in 2016. Migrants from a landing in Lampedusa reported Monday (20/03) that perhaps 10 people went missing but information is still unclear – other witnesses said three went missing. These additional fatalities are not included in today’s figures. IOM Italy on-field staffers are still investigating. This year at least 481 migrants or refugees have drowned or gone missing on the Central Mediterranean route linking North Africa to Italy. Last year at this time, 159 migrants had been lost on this route.

These fatalities data do not include new information from IOM Libya, which is seeking to verify reports of several incidents that have occurred along the Libyan coast since Friday. Christine Petré of IOM Libya reported late Monday that since 19 March, four rescue missions have been conducted off the Libyan west coast, saving a total of 758 migrants.

She said that on 19 March, 215 migrants including 47 women were rescued off Zuwara from two rubber boats, a rescue that brought reports of three dead bodies and victims of burn injuries from spilled fuel. The rescue operation was carried out by the Libyan Coast Guard.

Those Zuwara victims were taken to a reception facility recently established by IOM with Dutch funding. IOM also worked with the Libyan Red Crescent (LRC) to provide food to the rescued migrants. IOM also distributed hygiene kits and winter blankets.

On 19 March, 223 migrants – 57 of them women (two of whom were pregnant) – sailing in two rubber boats were rescued off Tripoli. The migrants are currently at Triq Al Sekka detention centre. Seventeen migrants had chemical burns and two of the burn cases required hospital admission.

On 20 March, about 120 migrants were rescued off Az Zawiyah. The migrants were taken to Shuhada Al Nasr detention centre. The rescue operation was carried out by the Libyan Coast Guard.

On 20 March, some 200 migrants were also rescued off Az Zawiyah, including seven women and two children. There were reports of 10 bodies retrieved – one was a woman.

So far in 2017 IOM Libya reports 3,403 rescues at sea, with remains of 161 victims recovered.

Worldwide, Missing Migrants reports fatalities on this date top 1,000 (1,018, see chart, below), with the Mediterranean region accounting for the largest proportion of deaths – over half of the global total.

Region

2017

2016

Mediterranean

525

553

Europe

13

15

Middle East

10

33

North Africa

198

542

Horn of Africa*

64

87

Sub-Saharan Africa

12

23

Southeast Asia

44

35

East Asia

0

0

US/Mexico

61

53

Central America

10

20

Caribbean

81

38

South America

0

10

Total

1,018

1,409

* ‘Horn of Africa’ includes deaths in the Gulf of Aden and the Red Sea.

Missing Migrants has recorded this year, 64 in the Horn of Africa region, including 42 Somalis killed last week (17 March) off Hodeidah, Yemen, and two migrants shot in the Gulf of Aden near Yemen on 19 March. Last year to this date, Missing Migrants reported 87 killed in the Horn of Africa region.

IOM Yemen reported over the weekend that thus far a total of 104 survivors have been rescued from Friday’s tragedy near Hodeidah, out of which 13 critical cases were referred to hospitals in Hodeidah. The remaining 91 survivors with minor injuries, trauma and shock were placed in Hodeidah Detention Center, where irregular migrants are being kept for entering the country illegally.

The rescue operation mainly used fishing boats to collect the remains of 42 victims, some of which were placed in a limited capacity mortuary in Hodeidah while the remaining were kept in a fish cooler in Hodeidah fish market. The search for missing victims is ongoing.

“The International Organization for Migration (IOM) has responded to this tragic incident by providing lifesaving assistance to survivors at both Hodeidah Detention Centre and hospitals where the critical cases are being treated,” said Laurent De Boeck, IOM Yemen Chief of Mission. “IOM provided food and non-food items, medical and psychosocial assistance and WASH services. Additionally, IOM medical teams are closely following up the referred cases, facilitating examination, diagnostics and treatment process including surgeries which will be entirely covered by IOM,” he added.

IOM is providing lifesaving assistance including food and non-food items, medical and psychosocial and WASH services to migrants held in detention centres in Yemen while they are being processed for voluntary return. IOM assistance is also extended to detained asylum seekers and vulnerable Yemeni prisoners.

Additionally, IOM established and is managing two Migrants Response Point (MRP) sites in Hodeidah and Aden, where the most vulnerable migrants including elderly, unaccompanied minors and separated children are being assisted. The establishment of additional MRPs in Hodeidah, Sana’a and Aden is in process.

For the latest Mediterranean update infographic:
http://migration.iom.int/docs/MMP/170321_Mediterranean_Update.pdf

For latest arrivals and fatalities in the Mediterranean, please visit: http://migration.iom.int/europe

Learn more about the Missing Migrants Project at: http://missingmigrants.iom.int

For further information please contact:
Joel Millman at IOM Geneva, Tel: +41.79.103 8720, Email: jmillman@iom.int
Flavio Di Giacomo at IOM Italy, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int
Sabine Schneider at IOM Germany, Tel: +49 30 278 778 17 Email: sschneider@iom.int
IOM Yemen, Saba Malme, Sana’a, Tel: + 967 736 800 329 (mobile), Email: smalme@iom.int
IOM Greece: Daniel Esdras, Tel: +30 210 9912174, Email: iomathens@iom.int or Kelly Namia, Tel: +30 210 9919040, +30 210 9912174, Email: knamia@iom.int
Julia Black at IOM GMDAC, Tel: +49 30 278 778 27, Email: jblack@iom.int
Abby Dwommoh, IOM Turkey; Tel. (Direct): +90 (0)312 454 3048, Mobile: +90 (533) 698 7285, Email: adwommoh@iom.int or Mazen Aboulhosn, Tel: +9031245-51202, Email: maboulhosn@iom.int
IOM Libya: Othman Belbeisi, Tel: +216 29 600389, Email: obelbeisi@iom.int  or Christine Petré, Tel. (Direct):  +216 29 240 448, Email: chpetre@iom.int
Hicham Hasnaoui at IOM Morocco, Tel: + 212 5 37 65 28 81, Email: hhasnaoui@iom.int

For information or interview requests in French:
Florence Kim, IOM Geneva, Tel: +41 79 103 03 42, Email: fkim@iom.int
Flavio Di Giacomo, IOM Italy, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int

Posted: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 - 17:21Image: Region-Country: Europe and Central AsiaSwitzerlandThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMissing MigrantsRefugee and Asylum IssuesDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

ACP-EU Migration Programme Meets to Counter Human Trafficking, Migrant Smuggling

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 10:16
Language English

Guyana - IOM is kicking off a three-day inter-regional meeting today (21/03) in Georgetown, Guyana focusing on trafficking in human beings and smuggling of migrants.

The “Peer-to-Peer Exchange Meeting” brings together 70 delegates and experts from the African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) States and from the European Union (EU) to look at the most effective means to counter both phenomena at the local, regional and global levels.

“This is an excellent opportunity to learn from the experiences of experts from these three regions in preventing and responding to both trafficking in persons and migrant smuggling, including protection of victims and migrants who have suffered human rights abuses,” said IOM’s Rosilyne Borland, who will be facilitating the event. 

Both trafficking in human beings and migrant smuggling are highly profitable businesses that exploit people and involve transnational criminal networks. They are also very hard to be traced by the authorities. Trafficking and smuggling are defined as two distinct crimes within the United Nations Trans-crime Convention and related protocols. Trafficking in Human Beings is a crime against an individual while Smuggling of Migrants is a crime against a state. 

“It must be understood, however, that in spite of this difference, states usually have the same cadre of officials dealing with both issues,” said IOM’s Agueda Marin, Regional Thematic Specialist for counter-trafficking in human beings.

Running through Thursday (23/03), this is the second peer-to-peer exchange meeting organized for stakeholders under IOM’s “ACP-EU Migration Action” programme. The meetings are designed to provide an interactive forum to exchange challenges, lessons learned, and good practices identified to date in the implementation of the programme. They will also build on the recommendations spelled out on the ACP-EU Dialogue documents.

Three of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) agreed by UN Member States in September 2015 make specific reference to ending trafficking in human beings.

UN agencies working in the fields of counter-trafficking and counter-smuggling of migrants are participating in the meeting and will contribute to drafting concrete recommendations to the ACP-EU Dialogue to reach the targets set out in the SDGs. Representatives from UN Women, UNODC and UNICEF will speak to the issues of eliminating all forms of violence against all women and girls in public and private spheres (SDG 5.2), ending abuse, exploitation, trafficking and all forms of violence and torture against children (SDG 16.2), and ending modern slavery and human trafficking (target 8.7).

IOM’s ACP-EU Migration Action, launched in June 2014, provides tailored technical support on migration to countries in all ACP regions. To date it has received 58 technical assistance requests from 44 ACP governments and 5 regional organizations. A third of these requests directly concern either counter-trafficking or counter-smuggling activities, with all of them touching the targets set up in the SDGs in one way or another.

The programme is financed by the 10th European Development Fund (EDF) and supported by the ACP Secretariat and the EU. 

In 2010, the ACP Group of States and the European Union agreed on a Joint Declaration on Migration and Development that was endorsed by the ACP-EU Council in June 2010. In the declaration the parties committed to strengthen and deepen cooperation in the Governance of migration and coordination of dialogue built on strategies to address irregular migration, enable regular migration, and migration and development, including issues related to counter-trafficking in persons and counter-smuggling of migrants.

Future peer-to-peer meetings will be held on other areas covered by the programme, such as visas and readmission. 

For further information, please contact the ACP-EU Migration Action at the IOM Regional Office in Brussels, Tel: +32 2 287 78 10, Email: ACPEUmigrationaction@iom.int, Web: www.acpeumigrationaction.iom.int

 

Posted: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 - 17:11Image: Region-Country: AmericaGuyanaThemes: Capacity BuildingCounter-TraffickingDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

IOM Libya Releases 2016 Displacement Trends Analysis Report

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 10:10
Language English

Libya - IOM Libya last week (17/03) published DTM Libya’s Internal Displacement in Libya – 2016 in Review which presents a comprehensive overview of Libya’s human mobility patterns, trends and dynamics for 2016. The report also provides an analysis of Libya’s internally displaced persons (IDP) displacement drivers, shelter settings, primary needs and demographics categorized by period of displacement.

The report contains data collected from across seven rounds of Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) data collection. By December 2016, DTM had recorded 303,608 IDPs and 453,540 returnees identified across the whole of Libya.

2016 was an important turning point in the dynamics of displacement and returns in the country. In the first half of the year, many IDPs were residing mainly in the regions of Banghazi, Al Wahat, Tripoli and Misratah. Most of the identified IDPs had been displaced following the eruption of conflict in 2014. The number of IDPs identified increased between May and August 2016 due to the fighting in Sirte. With the de-escalation of conflict in various parts of the country in the latter part of the year, the number of identified IDPs decreased while the number of returnees rose.

While most IDPs were recorded as residing in private accommodation, their reduced access to livelihood opportunities has left them particularly vulnerable to the increase in prices and rent as well as the current cash shortages. IDPs were also acutely affected by the limited availability of medical services, basic food and non-food items (NFIs); this has been confirmed by the latest round of data.

Most IDPs who returned to their homes in 2015 and 2016 went back to the regions of Al Jifarah, Banghazi, Al Jabal al Gharbi and Tripoli. The shelter setting for most returnees was their former home.

“This report provides an opportunity to better understand the context underpinning displacement in Libya,” noted DTM Programme Manager Daniel Salmon. “Shifts in the data are better understood when we examine and contextualize the factors that influenced the movement of IDPs and returnees in the country.”

DTM has been an authoritative source of information on internal displacement in Libya since its establishment in the country in late 2015. DTM data has been used by UN partners to identify and analyze the needs of the most vulnerable groups in Libya and to advocate for more targeted humanitarian assistance to them.

DTM has updated its methodology for 2017 to have a stronger focus on the primary needs of returnees and to gather more sectorial data for each area in response to shifts in displacement trends. DTM will also gather more multi-sectorial data on conditions in each baladiya (municipality) and on community relations between the population groups residing therein.

This report is the latest from the Libya DTM’s Mobility Tracking Module. Mobility Tracking facilitates the regular collection and dissemination of data on the numbers and locations of IDP populations as well as migration flows to, through and from Libya. It also captures Libya’s baseline demographic data on the number, age, sex, gender, origin and intention of the county’s IDP, returnee and migrant populations.

DTM informs the humanitarian response in Libya by identifying priority needs and regularly providing updates as the situation develops to facilitate the delivery of timely targeted humanitarian assistance and provide an evidence base for wider policy responses. 

For the full report and all other DTM publications, please see www.globaldtm.info/libya

For further information, please contact IOM Libya. Othman Belbeisi, Tel: +216 29 600389, Email: obelbeisi@iom.int or Daniel Salmon, Email: dsalmon@iom.int

 

Posted: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 - 17:03Image: Region-Country: Africa and Middle EastLibyaThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesInternally Displaced PersonsDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

New IOM Website Links Diaspora Expertise to Countries of Origin

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 10:03
Language English

Netherlands - IOM has launched a new website linking diaspora expertise in the Netherlands to selected host institutions in the countries of origin. The website is part of the Connecting Diaspora for Development (CD4D) project.

Through short physical and online assignments, professional diaspora experts are linked to key institutions identified by the six target countries: Afghanistan, Ethiopia, Ghana, Morocco, Sierra Leone and Somalia.

The website provides relevant information about the priority sectors and institutions in all target countries and an overview of all vacancies with host institutions. Interested candidates can apply directly via the website.

Selected participants are encouraged to give visibility to their engagement with the host institution via blogs and vlogs on the website. The strengthened connections between diaspora individuals and the host institutions will contribute to reconstruction and sustainable development in the countries of origin.

One such CD4D participant is Aziz Arrouchdi, a social worker with an international track record related to training counsellors working with vulnerable young people. Arrouchdi was assigned to the Rawabit Assadaka Association in Tangier, Morocco, which empowers 8 to 18 year olds from socio-economically disadvantaged neighbourhoods by offering activities in arts, education and sports.

He has coached the centre’s instructors in social and psychological guidance. He has also developed a special training kit manual and coached trainers how to train other staff involved in the centre’s activities. His key motivation for this assignment was to share his knowledge as a sociologist and psychological specialist to help create opportunities for a better future for young people from underprivileged backgrounds.

The CD4D project is funded by the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and is a continuation of IOM’s successful Temporary Return of Qualified Nationals (TRQN) project. 

Find out more about CD4D here: http://www.connectingdiaspora.org/en/

For further information, please contact Marian Lenshoek at IOM in The Hague, Tel. + 31 651 576013, Email: mlenshoek@iom.int

 

Posted: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 - 16:59Image: Region-Country: Europe and Central AsiaNetherlandsThemes: IOMMigration ResearchOthersDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

Oxford Conference Addresses Needs of Migrants in Countries in Crisis

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 09:59
Language English

Switzerland - IOM presented the Migrants in Countries in Crisis (MICIC) Initiative Guidelines at a major international conference organized by the Refugee Studies Centre at Keble College, Oxford, last week (16-17/03). 

The conference Beyond Crisis: Rethinking Refugee Studies looked at ways to assess knowledge, evidence, practices and concepts needed to understand and respond to contemporary challenges linked to crises and forced displacement.

The conference also brought together a range of academics, policymakers and practitioners, with the aim of strengthening the research agenda and scholarly community on this topic, and more effectively engage with the long-term challenges of forced displacement.

IOM was represented by Heather Komenda, Lorenzo Guadagno and Sanjula Weerasinghe, whose presentations were featured in a panel on Frameworks to Address Situational and Embodied Vulnerabilities of Migrants, addressed from a practitioner perspective. The panel explored policy and practice-oriented interventions to better address barriers to accessing information, resources and assistance migrants may experience in crisis situations and to better harness their capacities, both to reduce their vulnerability and to improve the resilience of their communities of origin and destination. 

In particular, the MICIC Initiative Guidelines to Protect Migrants in Countries Experiencing Conflict or Natural Disaster, presented by Weerasinghe, highlighted the benefits to be derived from preparatory actions, which provide migrants with the necessary conditions and tools to enhance their resilience, as migrants face different challenges to citizens in the context of disasters and conflicts.

Legal status, isolation, language barriers, and documentation requirements present unique hurdles that often prevent migrants from accessing safety. Yet within migrant communities, there are skills and capacities that can be leveraged to address these same vulnerabilities. Interventions are most effective when implemented well before a crisis erupts.

IOM also presented on the importance of including migrants in Disaster Risk Management with Guadagno highlighting how this need has been explicitly recognized in a number of global policy discussions, and enshrined in the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015–2030.

“Addressing migrants’ needs more effectively requires extending emergency management coordination to many nontraditional actors, including consulates and embassies, civil society organizations, and migrants themselves,” highlighted Guadagno in his intervention. “This is a much broader set of stakeholders than those usually considered by mandated emergency management institutions.”

He also outlined the efforts IOM has been undertaking in this field under the MICIC Initiative. These included gathering relevant practices and generating evidence and guidance on the topic, supporting capacity-building of staff from relevant institutions in selected countries around the world, and setting up national coordination mechanisms to improve inclusion of migrants in Disaster Risk Reduction and Management work.

IOM’s presentations were complemented by contributions by the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) which launched a smart practices database, another important resource that can inspire practitioners to develop new approaches for meeting migrant needs. This collection of skills and knowledge aims to ensure that the Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement and other partners have the knowledge, resources and capacities to support vulnerable migrants.

For further information, please contact Sanjula Weerasinghe at IOM Geneva. Tel: +41 22 717 9190, Email: sweerasinghe@iom.int

 

Posted: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 - 16:53Image: Region-Country: Europe and Central AsiaSwitzerlandThemes: Capacity BuildingOthersDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

Over 400 Participate in Cross-Border Crisis Simulation Exercise in Niger

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 09:51
Language English

Niger - More than 400 participants representing communities, authorities, civil society and security forces participated in a crisis simulation exercise organized by IOM Niger last week (14/3) in close partnership with the authorities.

Among the partners were the Prime Minister's Office, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Ministry of Defence, the Ministry of Humanitarian Action and Natural Disaster Management, and the Ministry of Health.

The exercise was held as part of the project Engaging Communities in Border Management in Niger, funded by the United States Department of State, as part of the Flintlock 2017 programme.

The exercise was held in Zinder, southern Niger, close to the border areas regularly suffering from terrorist incidents linked to the Boko Haram armed group. It tested the reaction and coordination capacities of the authorities in the context of a sudden event which would result in a massive population displacement.

The main objective of the project is to integrate the border populations as a key player in the response to cross-border crisis but, above all, in the prevention of such a crisis. Communities are the first to witness and observer a crisis situation, whether affecting health or safety, and, as a result, the way they communicate this to the competent authorities is a priority.

The conclusions of the Flintlock exercise will help determine the points that need to be strengthened and will outline the national contingency plan in response to cross-border crises.

“This exercise has once again shown the commitment and determination of the Nigerien authorities and populations to work together to prevent and respond to sudden crises,” said Giuseppe Loprete, Chief of Mission at IOM Niger. “We hope through the project to further strengthen this determination and coordination among all key players,” he concluded.

The capacity-building process for crisis response will continue by organizing a second simulation exercise later this year, in support of the contingency plan developed jointly with all the authorities present along the borders.

At the end of this exercise, three 40 square metre tents were handed over to the Zinder Governorate, while 300 hygiene kits were provided to the participating members of the communities.

For further information, please contact Marina Schramm at IOM Niger, Tel: +227 9050 3966, E-mail: mschramm@iom.int

 

Posted: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 - 16:49Image: Region-Country: Africa and Middle EastNigerThemes: Capacity BuildingIntegrated Border ManagementDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

IOM, Partner Train Business Managers on Responsible Recruitment in Thailand

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 09:49
Language English

Thailand - Over half of the world’s 21 million victims of forced labour are found in the Asia-Pacific region. In Thailand, recent reports on labour exploitation in the Thai fishing and agriculture sectors have heightened public attention on the issues of forced labour and human trafficking. This has prompted multinational companies to re-examine their global supply chains and put in place measures to prevent abuse.

In an effort to further promote the ethical recruitment of migrants and social accountability in Thailand, IOM and the Business Social Compliance Initiative (BSCI) of the Foreign Trade Association (FTA) have partnered together to jointly organize a two-day workshop for BSCI members starting today (21/3).

The training targets over 50 human resource and sourcing managers from Thai suppliers to major European importers and supermarket chains.

Aimed at sensitizing participants to the risks migrants may encounter during the recruitment process and employment, the workshop also encourages companies to implement responsible business practices and develop mitigation strategies.

As part of the training, IOM will share best practices in the areas of ethical recruitment and counter-trafficking including minimum standards for employment contracts, safe migration campaign and handling suspected cases of human trafficking.

BSCI will train participants on risk identification, due diligence and remediation procedures, and also highlight obligations suppliers must meet as part of its code of conduct.

“Consumers have become increasingly discerning in the products they buy. Companies that look after the wellbeing of migrant workers will ultimately benefit from decreased business risk, greater productivity and increased customer trust,” said IOM Thailand Chief of Mission, Dana Graber Ladek.   

The workshop is the first of a series of trainings conducted by IOM in partnership with BSCI for Thai producers focused on responsible recruitment, labour supply chain management and social compliance.

“This collaboration is proving very effective to bring to Thai producers the knowledge and hands-on experience they require to meet legal obligations and increase transparency in the recruitment of migrant workers,” said Anna Stancher, BSCI Social Programmes Manager.

The trainings are designed with the private sector in mind with materials adopted from IOM’s Corporate Responsibility in Eliminating Slavery and Trafficking (CREST) initiative.

IOM considers partnerships with the private sector a priority as part of its wider strategy to combat trafficking in persons and promote migrant rights.  

For further information please contact Petra Neumann at IOM Thailand, Email: pneumann@iom.int, Tel: +66 2 343 9333, or Reuben Lim, Email: rlim@iom.int, Tel: +66 2 343 9370

 

Posted: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 - 16:46Image: Region-Country: AsiaThailandThemes: Capacity BuildingCounter-TraffickingLabour MigrationDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM