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UN Migration Agency Supports Voluntary Humanitarian Return of 167 Guinean Migrants from Libya

IOM - News - Ven, 12/08/2017 - 08:26

Conakry – A flight chartered by IOM, the UN Migration Agency in Libya, arrived yesterday (07/12) at the Conakry-Gbessia International airport, Guinea, with 167 Guinean migrants, including seven unaccompanied migrant children, and three women with four children. Among the returnees were three medical cases that were directly transported to the hospital for medical follow up.

The returnees were welcomed by the Minister of Youth, the National Service of Humanitarian Affairs (SENAH), representatives of the Ministry of Guineans Abroad and the Ministry of Social Actions, a delegation from the European Union, and IOM.

Upon their arrival, returnees were provided with immediate assistance by IOM Guinea which included the provision of non-food items. IOM staff then began the registration and profiling process. The questionnaires will provide insight into the profile of the returnees, the reasons of their departure, their migratory path and their living conditions in Libya. It will help adapt the reintegration assistance to the needs of the returnees and their communities of return.

IOM Guinea also gave each returnee pocket money (EUR 50), in order to cover their immediate needs as well as the transportation costs. Within the next three months, IOM will assess the returnees’ situation on a case by case basis to help them find alternatives to ensure their sustainable reintegration in Guinea. IOM provides continuous psycho-social support to vulnerable migrants.

Most of the stranded migrants were held in detention centres in Trig al Matar, Tajoura and Qasr Ben Ghashir in the Tripoli region, Libya. Once they agreed to return, IOM conducted pre-departure interviews, medical examinations and facilitated the acquisition of travel documents and issuance of exit visas for all passengers.

“I was in Libya, and I spent three months in prison, I do not know the name because we never went out, only for beating sessions because I did not have money. I have a lot of pain in my upper body. I have to go to the hospital,”saidFrançois* to IOM staff.

Keita*, another returnee, was arrested in Sabratha together with his friends. After three months, they were sent to Tajoura. “We lost a friend not long ago. One day, we were taken out to eat the only daily meal, as he was not feeling well and he was hanging out, the guards have kicked him in the ribs. After that he started spitting and vomiting blood. Even his stool contained blood. He was sent to the infirmary. When we left, we asked for news about his condition. The doctor told us he had died. His parents do not know anything about it,”said Keita who must now tell his friend’s family about their son’s death.

Aicha*, who also returned on the chartered flight, borrowed the phone from an IOM staff: “Hello, Sister, it's Aicha, I'm at the airport, I'm back in Guinea because I did not want to die, but do not tell anyone. Not even to your own son because I myself did not tell anyone, not my mother, not even my husband. I do not know what they will give us here, but we need to see each other tomorrow. I need you. I came back but I would not stay at home, I have to find a rental even if it's a small room.”

Returning migrants residing in Conakry were able to return directly to their homes, while others from different parts of Guinea were accommodated for one night by SENAH at the Matam Transit Center, from where they will be able to reach their final destinations.

This was the 11th flight organized so far this year by IOM for Guinean migrants stranded in Libya. A total of 3,756 Guinean migrants were able to return to Guinea (including 4 per cent women and 5 per cent minors).

The returns and reintegration assistance are funded by the EUTF-IOM joint initiative for migrant protection and reintegration. Launched in April 2017 in Guinea, the project will be implemented over a period of three years and will cover six administrative regions: Conakry, Boké, Mamou, Labé, Kankan and N'zérékoré. As part of this project, IOM Guinea will support returnees, depending on their profiles and needs, to establish small businesses, as an individual or within a group, or to enroll them in vocational trainings.

*The names of migrants were changed to protect their privacy.

For more information, please contact Lucas Chandellier, IOM Guinea, Tel: +224 628 33 86 53, Email: lchandellier@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, December 8, 2017 - 15:09Image: Region-Country: GuineaThemes: Assisted Voluntary Return and ReintegrationHumanitarian EmergenciesDefault: Multimedia: 

Returnees were provided with immediate assistance by IOM Guinea Upon their arrival. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

IOM will assess the situation of every returnee in the coming three months to help them reintegrate into Guinean society. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

167 Guinean migrants, including 7 unaccompanied minors, and 3 women with 4 children arrived on Thursday 7 December. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Among the returnees were three medical cases who were directly transported to the hospital. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Most of the stranded migrants were held in detention centres in Trig al Matar, Tajoura and Qasr Ben Ghashir in the Tripoli region. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 165,409 in 2017 with Major Uptick in Western Route

IOM - News - Ven, 12/08/2017 - 08:25

Geneva – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, reports that 165,409 migrants and refugees entered Europe by sea in 2017 through 6 December, with nearly 20,000 of those arriving to Spain via the Western Mediterranean route. While the total number of arrivals to Europe across the Mediterranean is about half compared with the same period last year, the number of arrivals using the Western Mediterranean route to Spain is nearly triple that of last year, while deaths on the Western route have increased more than 40 per cent compared with 2016. 

IOM Spain’s Ana Dodevska reports that arrivals to Spain in 2017 through 7 December totalled 19,977.  This is a marked increase in use of the Spanish route, given that only 8,000 migrants entered Europe across the Mediterranean via Spain in all of 2016.  Already in 2017, 206 migrants died at sea using the Western Mediterranean route compared with 128 deaths along that route in all of last year.  
ARRIVALS BY SEA TO SPAIN 2017

Arrivals by sea to Italy, primarily departing from Libya, remain about one-third lower than 2016, according to IOM, the UN Migration Agency’s Rome office.  According to official figures of the Italian Ministry of Interior, 117,121 migrants arrived by sea to Italy this year: nearly 33 per cent less than the 181,346 migrants who arrived to Italy in the same period in 2016.

IOM staff are deployed at the main landing points in Sicily (including Lampedusa), Calabria and Apulia and provide legal assistance to those arriving by sea, monitor the reception conditions and support the authorities in the identification of vulnerable groups.

By contrast, arrivals by sea to Greece across the Eastern Mediterranean route from Turkey are significantly lower than last year.  Only 27,244 arrivals were reported to Greece as of 5 December, this year.  This compares with 173,614 sea arrivals in Greece in 2016.  

In Greece, IOM staff are present in the islands of Crete, Samos, Kos and Lesvos, working closely with authorities to identify vulnerable migrants including unaccompanied minors, elderly migrants, migrants with medical needs and families with children. Vulnerable groups are referred to authorities in order to be provided with the necessary care.
        
 

Worldwide, IOM’s Missing Migrants Project (MMP) has recorded the deaths of 5,204 people during migration in 2017. In the Western Mediterranean, three people (including one woman) died when the boat in which they were travelling overturned in waters close to Larache, Morocco, on 4 December. The Moroccan authorities rescued 40 people. On the same day, one migrant died off the coast of Nerja, Spain.
On the US/Mexico border, the remains of one migrant were found in Tecate, Baja California (Mexico) on 30 November. Additionally, reports emerged of the death of a 33-year-old man from Ecuador who drowned when crossing the Río Bravo on 21 January near Laredo, Texas. In Central America, a 12-year-old boy was hit by a train in Tenosique, Tabasco (Mexico) on 28 November, after crossing the border with Guatemala.
Missing Migrants Project data are compiled by IOM staff but come from a variety of sources, some of which are unofficial. To learn more about how data on missing migrants are collected, click here.

Latest Mediterranean Update infographic: http://migration.iom.int/docs/MMP/171208_Mediterranean_Update.pdf
For latest arrivals and fatalities in the Mediterranean, please visit: http://migration.iom.int/europe
Learn more about the Missing Migrants Project at: http://missingmigrants.iom.int
For more information, please contact:
Joel Millman at IOM HQ, Tel: +41 79 103 8720, Email: jmillman@iom.int
Mircea Mocanu, IOM Romania, Tel:  +40212115657, Email: mmocanu@iom.int
Dimitrios Tsagalas, IOM Cyprus, Tel: + 22 77 22 70, E-mail: dtsagalas@iom.int
Flavio Di Giacomo, IOM Italy, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int
Kelly Namia, IOM Greece, Tel: +30 210 991 2174, Email: knamia@iom.int
Julia Black, IOM GMDAC, Tel: +49 30 278 778 27, Email: jblack@iom.int
Abby Dwommoh, IOM Turkey, Tel: +90 312 454 3048, Email: MediaIOMTurkey@iom.int
Christine Petré, IOM Libya, Tel: +216 29 240 448, Email: chpetre@iom.int
Ana Dodevska, IOM Spain, Tel: +34 91 445 7116, Email: adodevska@iom.int
Myriam Chabbi, IOM Tunisia, Tel: +216 71 860 312 ext 109, Mobile: +216 28 78 78 05, Email: mchabbi@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, December 8, 2017 - 15:08Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMissing MigrantsRefugee and Asylum IssuesDefault: Multimedia:  Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

Refugee Processing Centre Opens in Tanzania

IOM - News - Ven, 12/08/2017 - 08:24

Kigoma Region – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, opened on 5 December the Makere Refugee Processing Centre in Kasulu District, Kigoma Region, Tanzania. The centre serves as a one-stop facility for processing Congolese Refugees residing in Nyarugusu camp bound for resettlement primarily to the US under the Refugee Admissions Program (USRAP) and other resettlement countries on cost-sharing basis.

The opening ceremony was led by Ambassador Mark C. Storella, Deputy Assistant Secretary for the US State Department Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration (PRM) and Chairperson of the Great Lakes Core Group, accompanied by the Chargé d’Affaires of the US Embassy in Tanzania and PRM staff from Washington DC and Kampala.

Representatives from other resettlement countries including Canada, Australia, United Kingdom (UK) and Belgium also attended. IOM was represented by Dr. Qasim Sufi, IOM Tanzania Chief of Mission and IOM officials from the Regional Office in Nairobi, Dar es Salaam and Kigoma. Joan Allison, Deputy Representative, led a UNHCR delegation along with senior resettlement staff from Geneva, Nairobi and Kasulu.

The Government was represented by (Rtd.) Brigadier General Emmanuel Maganga, Regional Commissioner for Kigoma region, Harrison Mseke, Director for Refugee Department of the Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA), the Kasulu District Commissioner and local leaders.

"The Makere Refugee Processing Centre is a clear evidence of a burden-sharing approach in easing refugee hosting by the international community and especially the US Government. The Government of Tanzania is very grateful for that,” said (Rtd) Brigadier General Maganga in his welcoming remarks.

For his part, Ambassador Storella commended IOM’s efforts that led to the completion and subsequent operations at the Centre ahead of schedule and within allocated budget. “IOM is a valued humanitarian partner for PRM worldwide, not just Tanzania,” he said. He also invited other resettlement countries to use the Centre to process refugees for resettlement on a cost-sharing basis.

The Makere Refugee Processing Centre has 23 interview rooms, five multi-purpose rooms, a full-fledged migration health clinic, canteen for up to 50 persons, 24 accommodation units and offices. The construction of the Centre took 11 months. Its proximity to Nyarugusu refugee camp will enable refugees to come for processing and return on the same day, cutting down three-hour travel time on rough road for processing in Kigoma and avoiding the need to spend several nights away from their homes.

“The Makere Refugee Processing Centre is the most important part of the expansion of the IOM Mission in Tanzania from 2015 that will positively contribute into the implementation process of the USRAP and other resettlement countries in Tanzania,” said Dr. Sufi addressing the Great Lakes Core Group delegation whose mission ran from 4 to 6 December 2017. “I'm very grateful to the Tanzanian Government for the allocation of land to IOM to build this important and modern facility through a 10-year MoU,” he added.

During a brief tour of the Centre, members of the Great Lakes Core Group could see ongoing medical screening carried out by the IOM Migration Health team and adjudication interviews by US officials.

For more information, please contact IOM Tanzania: Son Ha Dinh, Tel: +255 682006852, Email: shdinh@iom.int or Mira Simovska-Nikolic, Tel: + 255 682887018, Email: msimovska@iom.int 

Language English Posted: Friday, December 8, 2017 - 15:07Image: Region-Country: United Republic of TanzaniaThemes: Integrated Border ManagementDefault: Multimedia: 

The opening ceremony of the Makere Refugee Processing Centre was attended by government and non-government officials. Photo: Sweetbath Kailembo / UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

The Makere Refugee Processing Centre in Kasulu District, Tanzania opened on 5 December. Photo: Sweetbath Kailembo / UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

The Makere Refugee Processing Centre has 23 interview rooms, 5 multi-purpose rooms, a full-fledged migration health clinic, canteen for up to 50 persons, 24 accommodation units and offices. Photo: Sweetbath Kailembo / UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

UN Migration Agency Recognizes Anti-Trafficking Heroes in Ukraine

IOM - News - Ven, 12/08/2017 - 08:23

Kyiv – Children in conflict with the law, a police investigator and residents of a small Ukrainian village: sounds like the cast of a popular thriller. They were, in fact, all prize winners at the UN Migration Agency’s Seventh Combating Human Trafficking Awards, held yesterday (07/12) in the Ukrainian capital.

The awards are hosted by IOM, the UN Migration Agency, in Ukraine to mark the International Day of the Abolition of Slavery. They recognize individuals and institutions that have made outstanding contributions in the fight against modern-day slavery and draw attention to the joint efforts of the Government of Ukraine, civil society and the international community.

The ceremony was organized with the support of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). It was opened by IOM Ukraine Counter-Trafficking Goodwill Ambassador and Eurovision 2016 winner, Jamala, and IOM Ukraine Chief of Mission, Dr. Thomas Lothar Weiss. 

“We know that human trafficking evolves and perpetrators flourish in times of conflict and crisis, and indeed many of the trafficking survivors IOM Ukraine has supported were trafficked and exploited in the years of conflict since 2014,” said Dr. Weiss. “And while the conflict is going on, we must speak about the very real risks of human trafficking and emphasize the collective responsibility to fight the crime.”

“Today we honour the heroes who contribute to the fight against trafficking, who have shown determination, bravery and courage, and who inspire us in standing up against this most horrendous expression of modern day-slavery,” he added.

Specialists from the juvenile probation centre in Melitopol, a southern Ukrainian city, and four boys who had had run-ins with the law, were honoured for a trafficking awareness campaign they organized for youth in their region. 

Halyna Brulyova, a senior investigator at the National Police of Ukraine, was recognized for her investigation of an international trafficking case and helping Ukrainian victims to be released from prison in Brazil and return home.

Natalia Lavrysh, head of the village council in Cherevky, near Kyiv, Oksana Demyanchuk, a member of the council, and Tetyana Tymkiv, a local resident, won an award for helping a woman who was trapped by labour exploitation for 16 years.

Finally, the National Police, the Ministry of Social Policy of Ukraine, and the All-Ukrainian Counter-Trafficking NGO Coalition in Ukraine were also recognized for consolidating the Government and civil society efforts in building the national referral mechanism for assisting victims of trafficking.

According to research commissioned by IOM, over 230,000 Ukrainians have been victims of human trafficking since 1991, which makes Ukraine one of the main countries of origin of victims in Europe. An IOM survey shows that every fifth Ukrainian is ready to accept a risky job offer that can lead to trafficking. Since the year 2000, IOM Ukraine has identified and assisted almost 14,000 trafficking survivors.

 

For more information please contact Varvara Zhluktenko at IOM Ukraine, Tel: +38 044 568 50 15, Email: vzhluktenko@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, December 8, 2017 - 15:06Image: Region-Country: UkraineThemes: Counter-TraffickingDefault: Multimedia: 

Dr. Thomas Lothar Weiss, IOM Ukraine Chief of Mission, opening the awards ceremony. Photo: Dmytro Kunytskyi / UN Migration Agency (IOM) 

Jamala, IOM Ukraine Counter-Trafficking Goodwill Ambassador and Eurovision 2016 winner, opening the awards ceremony. Photo: Dmytro Kunytskyi / UN Migration Agency (IOM) 

Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

Cross-border Collaboration to Tackle Multi-Drug Resistant Tuberculosis in Kazakhstan

IOM - News - Ven, 12/08/2017 - 08:23

Astana – Tuberculosis is a major health concern in Central Asia, with Kazakhstan alone recording 16,000 cases per year. This entirely curable disease is posing a severe threat to the millions of migrants in the region, particularly as Kazakhstan becomes a destination country due to its booming natural resources sector.

There are more than 10 million migrants in Central Asia, and their at-risk status was highlighted this week at a high-level meeting in the capital Astana, as part of Kazakhstan’s plan on control of the disease. It focused on labour migrants and their increased risk for tuberculosis and its drug-resistant strains.

Migrant workers face health hazards throughout the migration process. They often have limited access to health services, which leads to late detection of the disease, as well as to irregular drug intake and unfinished treatment courses. The later cause a low cure rate, relapses and increasing numbers of patients with multi-drug resistant tuberculosis.

“Without addressing the needs of migrants, we cannot end the tuberculosis epidemic,” Dr. Lucia Ditiu, Executive Director of the Stop TB Partnership told delegates at the Astana meeting.

Her words were supported by Dr. Jaime Calderon, IOM Regional Migration Health Adviser for South-Eastern Europe, Eastern Europe and Central Asia. He drew on IOM’s experiences in Asia on addressing migrants’ access to healthcare services. 

“Ensuring migrants’ well-being requires concerted efforts between countries involved in their migration process,” said Dr. Calderon. “We need to ensure continuity of care and uninterrupted treatment for mobile populations through all health networks. We also need to work with the non-health sectors like the immigration, border security, economic and development sector in making them understand the importance of healthy migrants for healthy economies.”

For more information please contact Dr. Jaime Calderon at +43 6605812153, Email:  jcalderon@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, December 8, 2017 - 15:05Image: Region-Country: KazakhstanThemes: Migration HealthDefault: Multimedia: 

Dr. Jaime Calderon outlines the risks of tuberculosis and ways to protect oneself from it to migrants. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

UN Migration Agency, UNAIDS Renew Partnership Giving Migrants and Crisis-affected Populations Access to HIV Services

IOM - News - Ven, 12/08/2017 - 08:20
Language English

Geneva – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) today (08/12) signed a new cooperation agreement to ensure access to HIV prevention, treatment, care and support services for migrant and mobile populations as well as people affected by humanitarian emergencies.

“Migrants and mobile populations are exposed to a unique set of factors that render them more vulnerable to HIV/AIDS, including limited access to health services and information as well as exposure to environments that are conducive to engaging in high-risk behaviour,” said IOM Director General William Lacy Swing. “In order to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals of ‘leaving no one behind’, and to meet the Universal Health Coverage targets set therein, it is crucial that the rights of migrants to health be realized and effected through evidence-based, whole-of-government and cross-sector approaches, and IOM will continue to work closely with UNAIDS and other actors in jointly addressing these issues," added DG Swing.

“Migrant and refugee populations face many challenges which can make them more vulnerable to HIV,” said Michel Sidibé, Executive Director of UNAIDS. “Migrant and refugee populations must be supported and enabled to exercise their right to health which is why we are strengthening our partnership with IOM to ensure they are not left behind.” 

Under the new agreement, IOM and UNAIDS will encourage States to address the vulnerabilities to HIV and the specific health care needs experienced by migrant and mobile populations, as well as by refugees and crisis-affected populations. States will be encouraged to take steps to reduce stigma, discrimination and violence, as well as to review policies related to restrictions on entry based on HIV status, with a view to eliminating such restrictions, as well as the return of people based on their status, and to support their access to HIV prevention, treatment, care and support.

IOM and UNAIDS will also promote access to tailored comprehensive HIV prevention services for all women and adolescent girls, migrants and key populations and look at ways of addressing sexual and gender-based violence by working to ensure access to sexual and reproductive health-care services.

IOM and UNAIDS have a long-standing partnership, formalized in 1999. IOM is part of the UN Joint Team on HIV/AIDS at the country level and its HIV and population mobility programme complements the work of UNAIDS globally. 
During the 108th session of IOM Council, UNAIDS was granted Observer status by IOM, a sign of strengthened cooperation between the two institutions.

For more information, please contact Jorge Galindo at IOM HQ, Tel: +41227179205, Email: jgalindo@iom.int and Sophie Barton-Knott at UNAIDS, Tel: +41 22 791 1697, Email: bartonknotts@unaids.org or communications@unaids.org

About UNAIDS:
The Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) leads and inspires the world to achieve its shared vision of zero new HIV infections, zero discrimination and zero AIDS-related deaths. UNAIDS unites the efforts of 11 UN organizations – UNHCR, UNICEF, WFP, UNDP, UNFPA, UNODC, UN Women, ILO, UNESCO, WHO and the World Bank – and works closely with global and national partners towards ending the AIDS epidemic by 2030 as part of the Sustainable Development Goals. Learn more at unaids.org and connect with them on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

About IOM:
Established in 1951, IOM is the leading inter-governmental organization in the field of migration and works closely with governmental, intergovernmental and non-governmental partners. With 169 member states, a further 9 states holding observer status and offices in over 100 countries, IOM is dedicated to promoting humane and orderly migration for the benefit of all. It does so by providing services and advice to governments and migrants.

Posted: Friday, December 8, 2017 - 15:04Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandDefault: Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

UN Migration Agency Releases Recommendations to Incoming EU Council Presidency Bulgaria

IOM - News - Mer, 12/06/2017 - 04:35

Brussels – A new visa for vulnerable migrants, the Global Compact for Migration (GCM), the Common European Asylum System, and voluntary return and reintegration (AVRR) policies are the focus of recommendations that IOM, the UN Migration Agency, is releasing today (06/12) ahead of Bulgaria’s tenure at the helm of the Presidency of the Council of the European Union (EU) beginning in January 2018.

Eugenio Ambrosi, IOM Regional Director for the European Union, Norway and Switzerland presented IOM’s recommendations to the Bulgarian Government during a visit to Sofia. He said the Bulgarian Presidency will lead the Council of the EU at a pivotal time, as the need for intensified cooperation between countries, better protection of migrants, and more safe and regular migration pathways have captured global attention.

“Bulgaria will be leading the rotating EU Presidency through a critical period in the first six months of 2018. Migration challenges will remain considerable in the Mediterranean and in neighbouring regions, and will continue to impact the European asylum system. At the same time, migration policy is being defined internationally in the lead up to next year’s Global Compact for Migration,” said Ambrosi today in Brussels.  

“Our recommendations are rooted in IOM’s conviction that migration is not a phenomenon that should be stopped or managed on a crisis footing, but a human reality that must be governed with political courage, evidence-based vision, and a human-centered approach,” he said.   

IOM’s new recommendations paper sets out four key points for the Bulgarian Presidency. First, IOM calls on the EU and its Member States to take a leading role in the negotiations for the GCM to ensure the adoption of an ambitious agreement that becomes a unifying framework of common principles, commitments and understanding among Member States on all aspects of migration. 

The second recommendation is for the realization of a reformed Common European Asylum System (CEAS) which sets high standards of fairness and solidarity. Specifically, improvements to the relocation mechanism – such as making it permanent and automatic – and the adoption of a common and unified approach to resettlement through a Union Resettlement Framework are two crucial elements in this regard.  

While the CEAS focuses on international protection, many people who are not seeking asylum on the migration routes still have specific protection needs. IOM therefore proposes in its third recommendation the creation of a new EU visa for the most vulnerable migrants. The visa would help Member States to manage the movement of eligible migrants with specific protection needs, and to uphold their fundamental rights. It would also help to strengthen external border and identity management, which can bring improved security to both migrants and states.  

Finally, IOM calls on the incoming Presidency to ensure a rights-based, non-discriminatory and comprehensive approach in return and reintegration policies. Assisted voluntary return and reintegration (AVVR) is an indispensable part of a comprehensive approach to migration management. However, return migration should support, rather than define, an effective migration governance framework.

"IOM welcomes the Bulgarian Presidency's commitment to prioritizing migration. We are ready to support the Presidency and EU member states through its global expertise and operational tools to advance our joint commitment to improving global migration governance and ensuring that each and every migrant is assisted, with their fundamental rights upheld," said Ambrosi.

IOM's twice-yearly recommendations to the rotating EU Presidencies are guided by its Migration Governance Framework (MiGOF) which is the first, and so far only, global detailed articulation of planned and well-managed migration policies.

The six-month incumbent Presidents of the Council of the EU work together in groups of three in the interest of continuity and coherency. The current Presidential trio comprises Estonia (July/December 2017), Bulgaria (January/June 2018) and Austria (July/December 2018). The presidential representatives chair meetings at every level and propose the guidelines needed for the Council to take decisions.

IOM's recommendations can be downloaded here in PDF.

For more information please contact Radoslav Stamenkov at IOM Bulgaria, Tel: +359 886 177 053, Email:rstamenkov@iom.int, Ryan Schroeder Tel: +32 492 25 02 34, Email: rschroeder@iom.int or Sofiane Ouaret at the IOM EU Regional Office in Brussels, Tel: +32 2287 7120, Email: souaret@iom.int

Language English Posted: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 - 11:23Image: Region-Country: BelgiumDefault: Multimedia: 

Migrants and refugees in the Greek island of Lesbos. Photo: Amanda Nero/UN Migration Agency (IOM)

Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

UN Migration Agency Releases Recommendations to Incoming EU Council Presidency Bulgaria

IOM - News - Mer, 12/06/2017 - 04:35

Brussels – A new visa for vulnerable migrants, the Global Compact for Migration (GCM), the Common European Asylum System, and voluntary return and reintegration (AVRR) policies are the focus of recommendations that IOM, the UN Migration Agency, is releasing today (06/12) ahead of Bulgaria’s tenure at the helm of the Presidency of the Council of the European Union (EU) beginning in January 2018.

Eugenio Ambrosi, IOM Regional Director for the European Union, Norway and Switzerland presented IOM’s recommendations to the Bulgarian Government during a visit to Sofia. He said the Bulgarian Presidency will lead the Council of the EU at a pivotal time, as the need for intensified cooperation between countries, better protection of migrants, and more safe and regular migration pathways have captured global attention.

“Bulgaria will be leading the rotating EU Presidency through a critical period in the first six months of 2018. Migration challenges will remain considerable in the Mediterranean and in neighbouring regions, and will continue to impact the European asylum system. At the same time, migration policy is being defined internationally in the lead up to next year’s Global Compact for Migration,” said Ambrosi today in Brussels.  

“Our recommendations are rooted in IOM’s conviction that migration is not a phenomenon that should be stopped or managed on a crisis footing, but a human reality that must be governed with political courage, evidence-based vision, and a human-centered approach,” he said.   

IOM’s new recommendations paper sets out four key points for the Bulgarian Presidency. First, IOM calls on the EU and its Member States to take a leading role in the negotiations for the GCM to ensure the adoption of an ambitious agreement that becomes a unifying framework of common principles, commitments and understanding among Member States on all aspects of migration. 

The second recommendation is for the realization of a reformed Common European Asylum System (CEAS) which sets high standards of fairness and solidarity. Specifically, improvements to the relocation mechanism – such as making it permanent and automatic – and the adoption of a common and unified approach to resettlement through a Union Resettlement Framework are two crucial elements in this regard.  

While the CEAS focuses on international protection, many people who are not seeking asylum on the migration routes still have specific protection needs. IOM therefore proposes in its third recommendation the creation of a new EU visa for the most vulnerable migrants. The visa would help Member States to manage the movement of eligible migrants with specific protection needs, and to uphold their fundamental rights. It would also help to strengthen external border and identity management, which can bring improved security to both migrants and states.  

Finally, IOM calls on the incoming Presidency to ensure a rights-based, non-discriminatory and comprehensive approach in return and reintegration policies. Assisted voluntary return and reintegration (AVVR) is an indispensable part of a comprehensive approach to migration management. However, return migration should support, rather than define, an effective migration governance framework.

"IOM welcomes the Bulgarian Presidency's commitment to prioritizing migration. We are ready to support the Presidency and EU member states through its global expertise and operational tools to advance our joint commitment to improving global migration governance and ensuring that each and every migrant is assisted, with their fundamental rights upheld," said Ambrosi.

IOM's twice-yearly recommendations to the rotating EU Presidencies are guided by its Migration Governance Framework (MiGOF) which is the first, and so far only, global detailed articulation of planned and well-managed migration policies.

The six-month incumbent Presidents of the Council of the EU work together in groups of three in the interest of continuity and coherency. The current Presidential trio comprises Estonia (July/December 2017), Bulgaria (January/June 2018) and Austria (July/December 2018). The presidential representatives chair meetings at every level and propose the guidelines needed for the Council to take decisions.

IOM's recommendations can be downloaded here in PDF.

For more information please contact Radoslav Stamenkov at IOM Bulgaria, Tel: +359 886 177 053, Email:rstamenkov@iom.int, Ryan Schroeder Tel: +32 492 25 02 34, Email: rschroeder@iom.int or Sofiane Ouaret at the IOM EU Regional Office in Brussels, Tel: +32 2287 7120, Email: souaret@iom.int

Language English Posted: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 - 11:23Image: Region-Country: BelgiumDefault: Multimedia: 

Migrants and refugees in the Greek island of Lesbos. Photo: Amanda Nero/UN Migration Agency (IOM)

Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

Lost in Lebanon Opens Global Migration Film Festival

IOM - News - Mer, 12/06/2017 - 04:30

Geneva – The second edition of the Global Migration Film Festival opened yesterday (05/12) with the screening of Lost in Lebanon, at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva, Switzerland.

Addressing more than 350 attendees, Leonard Doyle, UN Migration Agency Head of Media and Communications introduced the film, announcing that this year, the Festival will present films in over 100 countries from Niger to Indonesia.

“This festival is a truly global event, sometimes taking place in venues like this, sometimes in a thousand-mile caravan driving through the desert from Agadez, Niger up to the border with Algeria, and sometimes in detention centers in Libya where migrants are suffering appallingly,” said Doyle.

Lost in Lebanon tells the stories of Sheik Abdo, Nemr, Reem and Mwafak, four Syrian refugees living in Lebanon. The documentary follows their struggle after leaving behind their friends and families, through the uncertainty that ensues when they lose their residency visas at the end of Lebanon’s open-door policy for refugees in early 2015, which rendered them unable to stay or return to their home country.

The four protagonists were not alone – by the end of 2016, 600,000 Syrians had lost their legal status in Lebanon. Despite the challenges, these characters remain committed to helping their displaced communities, whether by teaching young children at an informal school, offering counselling to fellow refugees, or sharing their artistic skills.

The film was followed by a panel discussion moderated by Riccardo Bocco, Professor of Anthropology and Sociology at the Graduate Institute, with directors Georgia and Sophia Scott, and Pindie Stephen, IOM Integration Senior Specialist.

“As filmmakers, we open a window for you to look through, and as a viewer you can do your own research, or lobby your own governments to change policy,” said Sophia Scott. “This film can have a great impact, but we need to partner with organizations,” she added.

Asked about how this film impacts the work of IOM, Stephen praised the film as a tool to help dispel the many myths about refugees. “As I watched this film it reminded me of how important it is to have these tools to share with others… It’s amazing to see how much these refugees contribute to their own people,” said Stephen. “It can also serve to prepare communities that are receiving refugees and can help prepare for their integration challenges,” she added.

The Global Migration Film Festival, organized by IOM with support from DHL and other partners, showcases films that capture the promise and challenges of migration. It runs from 5 to 18 December, International Migrants Day.

A committee of international film professionals and migration specialists will select three winners from the Emerging Filmmakers category and one from the Professional Filmmakers category.

Each winner will receive USD 1,500. The award ceremony will take place on 18 December in Les Cinémas du Grütli, Geneva.

For more information, please contact IOM HQ:

Amanda Nero, Tel: +41227179482, Email: anero@iom.int

Jorge Galindo, Tel: +41227179205, Email: jgalindo@iom.int

Language English Posted: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 - 11:23Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandDefault: Multimedia: 

The second edition of the Global Migration Film Festival drew over 350 attendees during its opening in Geneva on 5 December 2017. Photo: Muse Mohammed/UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

The second edition of the Global Migration Film Festival drew over 350 attendees during its opening in Geneva on 5 December 2017. Photo: Muse Mohammed/UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

Lost in Lebanon Opens Global Migration Film Festival

IOM - News - Mer, 12/06/2017 - 04:30

Geneva – The second edition of the Global Migration Film Festival opened yesterday (05/12) with the screening of Lost in Lebanon, at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva, Switzerland.

Addressing more than 350 attendees, Leonard Doyle, UN Migration Agency Head of Media and Communications introduced the film, announcing that this year, the Festival will present films in over 100 countries from Niger to Indonesia.

“This festival is a truly global event, sometimes taking place in venues like this, sometimes in a thousand-mile caravan driving through the desert from Agadez, Niger up to the border with Algeria, and sometimes in detention centers in Libya where migrants are suffering appallingly,” said Doyle.

Lost in Lebanon tells the stories of Sheik Abdo, Nemr, Reem and Mwafak, four Syrian refugees living in Lebanon. The documentary follows their struggle after leaving behind their friends and families, through the uncertainty that ensues when they lose their residency visas at the end of Lebanon’s open-door policy for refugees in early 2015, which rendered them unable to stay or return to their home country.

The four protagonists were not alone – by the end of 2016, 600,000 Syrians had lost their legal status in Lebanon. Despite the challenges, these characters remain committed to helping their displaced communities, whether by teaching young children at an informal school, offering counselling to fellow refugees, or sharing their artistic skills.

The film was followed by a panel discussion moderated by Riccardo Bocco, Professor of Anthropology and Sociology at the Graduate Institute, with directors Georgia and Sophia Scott, and Pindie Stephen, IOM Integration Senior Specialist.

“As filmmakers, we open a window for you to look through, and as a viewer you can do your own research, or lobby your own governments to change policy,” said Sophia Scott. “This film can have a great impact, but we need to partner with organizations,” she added.

Asked about how this film impacts the work of IOM, Stephen praised the film as a tool to help dispel the many myths about refugees. “As I watched this film it reminded me of how important it is to have these tools to share with others… It’s amazing to see how much these refugees contribute to their own people,” said Stephen. “It can also serve to prepare communities that are receiving refugees and can help prepare for their integration challenges,” she added.

The Global Migration Film Festival, organized by IOM with support from DHL and other partners, showcases films that capture the promise and challenges of migration. It runs from 5 to 18 December, International Migrants Day.

A committee of international film professionals and migration specialists will select three winners from the Emerging Filmmakers category and one from the Professional Filmmakers category.

Each winner will receive USD 1,500. The award ceremony will take place on 18 December in Les Cinémas du Grütli, Geneva.

For more information, please contact IOM HQ:

Amanda Nero, Tel: +41227179482, Email: anero@iom.int

Jorge Galindo, Tel: +41227179205, Email: jgalindo@iom.int

Language English Posted: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 - 11:23Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandDefault: Multimedia: 

The second edition of the Global Migration Film Festival drew over 350 attendees during its opening in Geneva on 5 December 2017. Photo: Muse Mohammed/UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

IOM's Fatal Journeys Reveals How Data Collection on Missing Migrants Can Be Improved

IOM - News - Mar, 12/05/2017 - 10:19

Since 2014, IOM’s Missing Migrants Project has documented more than 25,000 migrant deaths and disappearances around the world. However, a new report released by IOM’s Global Migration Data Analysis Centre (GMDAC) today indicates that this figure does not reflect the true number of deaths which occur during migration worldwide. In many regions of the world anecdotal and unofficial reports indicate that many more migrant deaths and disappearances occur than are recorded.

The new report, the second part of Fatal Journeys Volume 3: Improving data on missing migrants, provides an in-depth look at the challenges of collecting data on migrant fatalities in six regions: the Middle East and North Africa, sub-Saharan Africa, the Asia-Pacific, Central America, South America, and Europe and the Mediterranean. Each chapter also explores how data collection can be improved.

The many challenges specific to each region mean that data on migrant deaths may never be complete, however significant improvements could be made across the world. Fatal Journeys 3 makes five key recommendations based on the innovative methodologies discussed in part one, and the regional comparisons made in part two of the report:

1. Make better use of administrative data
Local, national and regional authorities should collect and publish data on migrant deaths and disappearances. These authorities should standardize collection procedures and methodologies so that the data might be more easily compared.

2. Promote survey-based data collection
In areas where few official data exist, survey-based data collection should include collecting eyewitness testimonies from migrants who have witnessed the deaths of their peers.

3. Explore new technologies
New and emerging data collection techniques and sources, such as big data, can improve the quality and coverage of data on missing migrants.

4. Work with civil society and families
The needs of families of missing migrants should be considered at all stages of data collection and processing of deceased migrants. Families and civil society groups can provide key information to aid the identification of migrants who have died or gone missing.

5. Improve data sharing
One of the most achievable ways to improved data on missing migrants worldwide is to improve communication between actors working on the issue. Data on missing migrants are often scattered and fragmented, and data sharing should be promoted wherever possible in order to maximize accuracy.

While the dangerous journeys of migrants travelling across the Mediterranean Sea have been widely reported since 2013, most migrant deaths likely occur in large unpatrolled spaces, and are not captured in the coverage of migration ‘crises’. The attention on the Mediterranean has led to better data on migrant deaths en route to Europe, but there is little public or policy awareness of the risks migrants encounter before they reach the coasts of Turkey and North Africa.
Improving data on migrant deaths is extremely important at a time when states are discussing how best to achieve safer migration. Building upon the New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants, which calls for safe, ordinary and regular migration, the Global Compact for Migration will be signed in 2018. Gathering more and better-quality data on deaths that occur during migration is essential to improving the evidence base for these policy discussions.
For further information, please refer to the full report, available here.

For further information you may also contact:

Frank Laczko, Director, IOM GMDAC, Berlin, Tel: +49 (0) 151 11676795 - Email: flaczko@iom.int
Julia Black, Missing Migrants Project Coordinator, IOM GMDAC, Tel: +49 30 278 778 27, Email: jblack@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, December 5, 2017 - 15:30Image: Region-Country: GermanyThemes: Migration ResearchDefault: Multimedia:  Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

IOM's Fatal Journeys Reveals How Data Collection on Missing Migrants Can Be Improved

IOM - News - Mar, 12/05/2017 - 10:19

Since 2014, IOM’s Missing Migrants Project has documented more than 25,000 migrant deaths and disappearances around the world. However, a new report released by IOM’s Global Migration Data Analysis Centre (GMDAC) today indicates that this figure does not reflect the true number of deaths which occur during migration worldwide. In many regions of the world anecdotal and unofficial reports indicate that many more migrant deaths and disappearances occur than are recorded.

The new report, the second part of Fatal Journeys Volume 3: Improving data on missing migrants, provides an in-depth look at the challenges of collecting data on migrant fatalities in six regions: the Middle East and North Africa, sub-Saharan Africa, the Asia-Pacific, Central America, South America, and Europe and the Mediterranean. Each chapter also explores how data collection can be improved.

The many challenges specific to each region mean that data on migrant deaths may never be complete, however significant improvements could be made across the world. Fatal Journeys 3 makes five key recommendations based on the innovative methodologies discussed in part one, and the regional comparisons made in part two of the report:

1. Make better use of administrative data
Local, national and regional authorities should collect and publish data on migrant deaths and disappearances. These authorities should standardize collection procedures and methodologies so that the data might be more easily compared.

2. Promote survey-based data collection
In areas where few official data exist, survey-based data collection should include collecting eyewitness testimonies from migrants who have witnessed the deaths of their peers.

3. Explore new technologies
New and emerging data collection techniques and sources, such as big data, can improve the quality and coverage of data on missing migrants.

4. Work with civil society and families
The needs of families of missing migrants should be considered at all stages of data collection and processing of deceased migrants. Families and civil society groups can provide key information to aid the identification of migrants who have died or gone missing.

5. Improve data sharing
One of the most achievable ways to improved data on missing migrants worldwide is to improve communication between actors working on the issue. Data on missing migrants are often scattered and fragmented, and data sharing should be promoted wherever possible in order to maximize accuracy.

While the dangerous journeys of migrants travelling across the Mediterranean Sea have been widely reported since 2013, most migrant deaths likely occur in large unpatrolled spaces, and are not captured in the coverage of migration ‘crises’. The attention on the Mediterranean has led to better data on migrant deaths en route to Europe, but there is little public or policy awareness of the risks migrants encounter before they reach the coasts of Turkey and North Africa.
Improving data on migrant deaths is extremely important at a time when states are discussing how best to achieve safer migration. Building upon the New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants, which calls for safe, ordinary and regular migration, the Global Compact for Migration will be signed in 2018. Gathering more and better-quality data on deaths that occur during migration is essential to improving the evidence base for these policy discussions.
For further information, please refer to the full report, available here.

For further information you may also contact:

Frank Laczko, Director, IOM GMDAC, Berlin, Tel: +49 (0) 151 11676795 - Email: flaczko@iom.int
Julia Black, Missing Migrants Project Coordinator, IOM GMDAC, Tel: +49 30 278 778 27, Email: jblack@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, December 5, 2017 - 15:30Image: Region-Country: GermanyThemes: Migration ResearchDefault: Multimedia:  Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 164,779 in 2017; Deaths Reach 3,086

IOM - News - Mar, 12/05/2017 - 08:51

Geneva – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, reports that 164,779 migrants and refugees entered Europe by sea in 2017 through 3 December, with just over 70 per cent arriving in Italy and the remainder divided between Greece, Cyprus and Spain. This compares with 351,076 arrivals across the region through the same period last year.

IOM Rome reported Monday (4 December) that, according to Ministry of Interior figures, 117,120, or just 78 through the first three days of this month. For the year to date, totals are approximately 32% fewer than arrived by sea to Italy at this point last year.
Since 1 August 2017 a total of 21,903 men, women and children have arrived in Italy by sea from North Africa. That amount is nearly identical to the totals arriving in August alone both in 2015, and again last year. Overall, the months of August-November 2017 witnessed roughly one-quarter of the migrant total (79, 615) that arrived in Italy last year during a similar period and less than half the total (50,667) arriving in 2015 during the same months (see chart below).

IOM Cyprus'  Dimitrios Tsagalas reported Tuesday morning on a boat arrival with migrants on board, spotted at the Kato Pyrgos area in Pafos. IOM Cyprus said the boat was observed by authorities at 01:00 am on 05 December and was said to be carrying 38 migrants (33 men, one woman and four children) all of Syrian nationality. These migrants were transferred to the city of Polis in the Pafos area for health and police checks at 03:00 AM. Later today they are expected to be transported to the Purnara Reception Centre.     
IOM’s Missing Migrant Project (MMP) confirmed that on Thursday, 30 November, the Moroccan Coast Guard rescued six occupants of a boat reportedly with 34 migrants on board. Today’s report treats as presumed dead the 28 missing migrants, reportedly all from sub-Saharan Africa, a group said to have included four women, 23 men and one child.
IOM also updated a report of a shipwreck in the Central Mediterranean which occurred on 23 November, in which UNHCR reported an additional 20 migrants of unknown origin were lost at sea. At least one was an Eritrean woman, who was reported dead by family members who were rescued.
These losses bring to 3,086 the total number of men, women and children lost on the Mediterranean through 3,337 days of the current year. That is an average daily death toll of just over 11 people per day. Last year, at this time, Missing Migrants recorded 4,757 victims on the Mediterranean, or over 14 per day.
Worldwide, Missing Migrant Project has recorded the deaths of 5,194 people during migration in 2017. In addition to the 48 new deaths reported in the Western and Central Mediterranean, MMP learned that in Turkey, ten Syrians – including six children – died this past weekend in a minibus accident. Eight more Syrians were injured in the accident, which occurred on Sunday in the Hatay district of Turkey. These deaths mark the third incident in the last two weeks in which IOM has recorded the deaths of migrants attempting to travel overland between Turkey and Greece.  (see chart below)
Missing Migrants Project (MMP) data are compiled by IOM staff but come from a variety of sources, some of which are unofficial. To learn more about how data on missing migrants are collected, click here.

Latest Mediterranean Update infographic: http://migration.iom.int/docs/MMP/171205_Mediterranean_Update.pdf
For latest arrivals and fatalities in the Mediterranean, please visit: http://migration,iom,int/europe
Learn more about the Missing Migrants Project at: http://missingmigrants,iom,int

For more information, please contact:
Joel Millman at IOM HQ, Tel: +41 79 103 8720, Email: jmillman@iom.int
Mircea Mocanu, IOM Romania, Tel:  +40212115657, Email: MMOCANU@iom.int
Dimitrios Tsagalas, IOM Cyprus, Tel: + 22 77 22 70, E-mail: dtsagalas@iom.int
Flavio Di Giacomo, IOM Coordination Office for the Mediterranean, Italy, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int
Hicham Hasnaoui at IOM Morocco, Tel: + 212 5 37 65 28 81, Email: hhasnaoui@iom.int
Kelly Namia, IOM Greece, Tel: +30 210 991 2174, Email: knamia@iom.int
Julia Black, IOM GMDAC, Tel: +49 30 278 778 27, Email: jblack@iom.int
Christine Petré, IOM Libya, Tel: +216 29 240 448, Email: chpetre@iom.int
Ana Dodevska, IOM Spain, Tel: +34 91 445 7116, Email: ADODEVSKA@iom.int
Myriam Chabbi, IOM Tunisia, Tel :  +216 28 78 78 05 (mobile) office: +216 71 860 312 EXT. 109  Email: mchabbi@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, December 5, 2017 - 15:26Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMissing MigrantsDefault: Multimedia:  Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 164,779 in 2017; Deaths Reach 3,086

IOM - News - Mar, 12/05/2017 - 08:51

Geneva – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, reports that 164,779 migrants and refugees entered Europe by sea in 2017 through 3 December, with just over 70 per cent arriving in Italy and the remainder divided between Greece, Cyprus and Spain. This compares with 351,076 arrivals across the region through the same period last year.

IOM Rome reported Monday (4 December) that, according to Ministry of Interior figures, 117,120, or just 78 through the first three days of this month. For the year to date, totals are approximately 32% fewer than arrived by sea to Italy at this point last year.
Since 1 August 2017 a total of 21,903 men, women and children have arrived in Italy by sea from North Africa. That amount is nearly identical to the totals arriving in August alone both in 2015, and again last year. Overall, the months of August-November 2017 witnessed roughly one-quarter of the migrant total (79, 615) that arrived in Italy last year during a similar period and less than half the total (50,667) arriving in 2015 during the same months (see chart below).

IOM Cyprus'  Dimitrios Tsagalas reported Tuesday morning on a boat arrival with migrants on board, spotted at the Kato Pyrgos area in Pafos. IOM Cyprus said the boat was observed by authorities at 01:00 am on 05 December and was said to be carrying 38 migrants (33 men, one woman and four children) all of Syrian nationality. These migrants were transferred to the city of Polis in the Pafos area for health and police checks at 03:00 AM. Later today they are expected to be transported to the Purnara Reception Centre.     
IOM’s Missing Migrant Project (MMP) confirmed that on Thursday, 30 November, the Moroccan Coast Guard rescued six occupants of a boat reportedly with 34 migrants on board. Today’s report treats as presumed dead the 28 missing migrants, reportedly all from sub-Saharan Africa, a group said to have included four women, 23 men and one child.
IOM also updated a report of a shipwreck in the Central Mediterranean which occurred on 23 November, in which UNHCR reported an additional 20 migrants of unknown origin were lost at sea. At least one was an Eritrean woman, who was reported dead by family members who were rescued.
These losses bring to 3,086 the total number of men, women and children lost on the Mediterranean through 3,337 days of the current year. That is an average daily death toll of just over 11 people per day. Last year, at this time, Missing Migrants recorded 4,757 victims on the Mediterranean, or over 14 per day.
Worldwide, Missing Migrant Project has recorded the deaths of 5,194 people during migration in 2017. In addition to the 48 new deaths reported in the Western and Central Mediterranean, MMP learned that in Turkey, ten Syrians – including six children – died this past weekend in a minibus accident. Eight more Syrians were injured in the accident, which occurred on Sunday in the Hatay district of Turkey. These deaths mark the third incident in the last two weeks in which IOM has recorded the deaths of migrants attempting to travel overland between Turkey and Greece.  (see chart below)
Missing Migrants Project (MMP) data are compiled by IOM staff but come from a variety of sources, some of which are unofficial. To learn more about how data on missing migrants are collected, click here.

Latest Mediterranean Update infographic: http://migration.iom.int/docs/MMP/171205_Mediterranean_Update.pdf
For latest arrivals and fatalities in the Mediterranean, please visit: http://migration,iom,int/europe
Learn more about the Missing Migrants Project at: http://missingmigrants,iom,int

For more information, please contact:
Joel Millman at IOM HQ, Tel: +41 79 103 8720, Email: jmillman@iom.int
Mircea Mocanu, IOM Romania, Tel:  +40212115657, Email: MMOCANU@iom.int
Dimitrios Tsagalas, IOM Cyprus, Tel: + 22 77 22 70, E-mail: dtsagalas@iom.int
Flavio Di Giacomo, IOM Coordination Office for the Mediterranean, Italy, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int
Hicham Hasnaoui at IOM Morocco, Tel: + 212 5 37 65 28 81, Email: hhasnaoui@iom.int
Kelly Namia, IOM Greece, Tel: +30 210 991 2174, Email: knamia@iom.int
Julia Black, IOM GMDAC, Tel: +49 30 278 778 27, Email: jblack@iom.int
Christine Petré, IOM Libya, Tel: +216 29 240 448, Email: chpetre@iom.int
Ana Dodevska, IOM Spain, Tel: +34 91 445 7116, Email: ADODEVSKA@iom.int
Myriam Chabbi, IOM Tunisia, Tel :  +216 28 78 78 05 (mobile) office: +216 71 860 312 EXT. 109  Email: mchabbi@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, December 5, 2017 - 15:26Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMissing MigrantsDefault: Multimedia:  Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

100 Days Since Start of Crisis, Needs of Rohingya Refugees, Local Community Continue to Grow

IOM - News - Mar, 12/05/2017 - 08:48

Cox’s Bazar – It is now over 100 days since an upsurge in violence in Myanmar’s Northern Rakhine State forced some 625,792 Rohingya refugees to flee into Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh. The conditions of the congested settlements, where the refugees are now living, are extremely dire.

The impact of this influx can be felt widely in the already impoverished local communities living in the region, struggling to survive, such that the UN Humanitarian Response Plan aims to reach 300,000 members of the local community in need of assistance.

The water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) situation is not only of concern in the refugee settlements, where over 60 per cent of water is contaminated with E.coli, but also, in the local communities living nearby.

"Access to clean water and safe sanitation services is a problem for the communities hosting refugees in Cox's Bazar," said Alessandro Petrone, WASH Programme Manager for IOM's Rohingya Response. "A global and up to date WASH assessment providing a proper gaps analysis and an activities plan is urgently needed. IOM is developing a rated assessment tool and will deploy teams to the field in the coming days to support this work," said Petrone.

IOM, the UN Migration Agency, has constructed more than 3,800 latrines and 159 wells in six host community locations - Whykong, Palonkhali, Jaliapalong, Kutupalong, Rajapalong and Baharchora.

More than 30,000 host community members now have access to safe water and sanitation services. To ensure sustainability and to generate employment, IOM has trained and equipped local tube well caretakers.

Village Development Committees responsible for the overall management of these facilities were also established by IOM. Active community participation from the initial needs assessments to implementation and management has meant that facilities are well maintained and efficiently used.

Since 25 August,  IOM health teams in Cox’s Bazar have provided emergency and primary healthcare services to over 100,000 patients from the Rohingya and local Bangladeshi communities.

IOM supports 19 health facilities, nine of which provide services to both communities. At the community clinics located very close to the refugee settlements, including Kutupalong and Leda, approximately 30 per cent of patients seen are from the local Bangladeshi community. 

Under IOM’s outreach preventive programme, health promoters visit families in Ukhiya and Teknaf, sub-districts of Cox’s Bazar where the refugee settlements have developed, to register pregnant women and children, encourage and ensure antenatal and postnatal care visits, provide first aid care and refer complicated cases to IOM-supported centres for further treatment.

For more information, please contact

Fiona MacGregor at IOM Cox’s Bazar, Tel: +8801733335221, Email: fmacgregor@iom.int  

Shirin Ahkter at IOM Dhaka, Tel: +880 2 55044811-13, Email: sakhter@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, December 5, 2017 - 15:25Image: Region-Country: BangladeshThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMigration HealthRefugee and Asylum IssuesDefault: Multimedia: 

Men wait to be seen by the doctor at the IOM-supported Kutupalong Community Healthcare Clinic, which services both Rohingya refugees and the local Bangladesh community. Photot: Olivia Headon / UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

100 Days Since Start of Crisis, Needs of Rohingya Refugees, Local Community Continue to Grow

IOM - News - Mar, 12/05/2017 - 08:48

Cox’s Bazar – It is now over 100 days since an upsurge in violence in Myanmar’s Northern Rakhine State forced some 625,792 Rohingya refugees to flee into Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh. The conditions of the congested settlements, where the refugees are now living, are extremely dire.

The impact of this influx can be felt widely in the already impoverished local communities living in the region, struggling to survive, such that the UN Humanitarian Response Plan aims to reach 300,000 members of the local community in need of assistance.

The water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) situation is not only of concern in the refugee settlements, where over 60 per cent of water is contaminated with E.coli, but also, in the local communities living nearby.

"Access to clean water and safe sanitation services is a problem for the communities hosting refugees in Cox's Bazar," said Alessandro Petrone, WASH Programme Manager for IOM's Rohingya Response. "A global and up to date WASH assessment providing a proper gaps analysis and an activities plan is urgently needed. IOM is developing a rated assessment tool and will deploy teams to the field in the coming days to support this work," said Petrone.

IOM, the UN Migration Agency, has constructed more than 3,800 latrines and 159 wells in six host community locations - Whykong, Palonkhali, Jaliapalong, Kutupalong, Rajapalong and Baharchora.

More than 30,000 host community members now have access to safe water and sanitation services. To ensure sustainability and to generate employment, IOM has trained and equipped local tube well caretakers.

Village Development Committees responsible for the overall management of these facilities were also established by IOM. Active community participation from the initial needs assessments to implementation and management has meant that facilities are well maintained and efficiently used.

Since 25 August,  IOM health teams in Cox’s Bazar have provided emergency and primary healthcare services to over 100,000 patients from the Rohingya and local Bangladeshi communities.

IOM supports 19 health facilities, nine of which provide services to both communities. At the community clinics located very close to the refugee settlements, including Kutupalong and Leda, approximately 30 per cent of patients seen are from the local Bangladeshi community. 

Under IOM’s outreach preventive programme, health promoters visit families in Ukhiya and Teknaf, sub-districts of Cox’s Bazar where the refugee settlements have developed, to register pregnant women and children, encourage and ensure antenatal and postnatal care visits, provide first aid care and refer complicated cases to IOM-supported centres for further treatment.

For more information, please contact

Fiona MacGregor at IOM Cox’s Bazar, Tel: +8801733335221, Email: fmacgregor@iom.int  

Shirin Ahkter at IOM Dhaka, Tel: +880 2 55044811-13, Email: sakhter@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, December 5, 2017 - 15:25Image: Region-Country: BangladeshThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMigration HealthRefugee and Asylum IssuesDefault: Multimedia: 

Men wait to be seen by the doctor at the IOM-supported Kutupalong Community Healthcare Clinic, which services both Rohingya refugees and the local Bangladesh community. Photot: Olivia Headon / UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

UN Migration Agency’s Data Analysis Centre Publishes New Series of Data Bulletins

IOM - News - Mar, 12/05/2017 - 08:47

Berlin – A new series launched by the Global Migration Data Analysis Centre (GMDAC) of IOM, the UN Migration Agency, aims to summarize the existing evidence on migration in an accurate and accessible fashion, to support discussions and any follow-up activities of the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration.

The Data Bulletins are part of a project Support to IOM for the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration, funded by the European Union, to outline the strengths and limitations of relevant migration data, and highlight innovative data practices which are pertinent to a global compact for migration. 

Data Bulletins reflect the collaborative nature of a global compact for migration process by including relevant contributions from different parts of IOM, as well as other agencies and migration experts. The first three issues are being published for distribution during the preparatory stocktaking meeting in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, currently taking place through to 6 December 2017. 

The first issue, Global Migration Trends, provides a brief overview of key global migration trends, based on available statistics and estimates from a variety of sources, to support informed decision-making throughout a global compact for migration process. The document summarizes key facts and figures on a range of migration-related topics, covering the period January 2015–December 2016, and cites more recent figures when available.

Although this Data Bulletin is by no means exhaustive, it presents a broad picture of the state of migration around the world. A more detailed report on global migration trends will be published by IOM’s GMDAC in December 2017.

More Than Numbers: The Value of Migration Data is the second issue in the series. Produced by IOM’s GMDAC with analytic support from McKinsey & Company, this Data Bulletin makes the case that there is significant value in migration which can be better leveraged by identifying and making targeted investments in data. It outlines a framework to prioritize data needs and investments, and points to potential next steps at the global, regional and national levels.

A full report will be released in January 2018, detailing a vision for how data can enable value capture in migration.

The third issue of the Data Bulletin, Measuring Migration Governance, describes strategies for understanding and enhancing national migration policies and governance structures. By providing a clear overview of selected indices of migration policies, this issue of the Data Bulletin series aims to give policymakers the information and tools to assess and improve on migration governance, which has become increasingly important in the context of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

The Migration Governance Indicators (MGI), developed by IOM and the Economist Intelligence Unit in 2015–2016, are examples of these tools. They are applied in full consultation with national authorities to measure good migration governance through a comprehensive framework covering six main policy domains.

The MGIs help countries assess the extent to which their migration policy is comprehensive, thereby identifying best practices and areas in need of further development. The MGIs can also help countries develop baseline assessments and conduct future reviews of their work to assess progress in the context of the SDGs and the Global Compact for Migration.

The six policy domains are based on IOM’s Migration Governance Framework (MiGOF).

For more information on the MGI and MiGOF please see https://gmdac.iom.int/migration-governance-indicators and http://www.iom.int/multilateral-processes.  

The Data Bulletin: Informing a Global Compact for Migration will continue to focus on providing policymakers with the information and analysis required for evidence-based decision making. Future issues will be published and distributed, notably at key events related to a global compact for migration process throughout 2018.

For more information please contact:

IOM's Global Migration Data Analysis Centre (GMDAC), Tel.: +49 30 278 778 11, Email: www.gmdac.iom.int

Denis Kierans, IOM GMDAC, dkierans@iom.int

Marzia Rango, IOM GMDAC, mrango@iom.int

Abdel Rahmane Diop, IOM Global Compact for Migration Team, ardiop@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, December 5, 2017 - 15:24Image: Region-Country: GermanyThemes: Global CompactGlobal Compact on MigrationMigration ResearchDefault: Multimedia: 

The first issue, “Global Migration Trends,” provides an overview of key global migration trends, based on available statistics and estimates from a variety of sources. Photo: Amanda Nero / UN Migration Agency (IOM)

IOM’s Global Migration Data Analysis Centre aims to summarize the existing evidence on migration in an accurate and accessible fashion. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM)

Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

UN Migration Agency’s Data Analysis Centre Publishes New Series of Data Bulletins

IOM - News - Mar, 12/05/2017 - 08:47

Berlin – A new series launched by the Global Migration Data Analysis Centre (GMDAC) of IOM, the UN Migration Agency, aims to summarize the existing evidence on migration in an accurate and accessible fashion, to support discussions and any follow-up activities of the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration.

The Data Bulletins are part of a project Support to IOM for the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration, funded by the European Union, to outline the strengths and limitations of relevant migration data, and highlight innovative data practices which are pertinent to a global compact for migration. 

Data Bulletins reflect the collaborative nature of a global compact for migration process by including relevant contributions from different parts of IOM, as well as other agencies and migration experts. The first three issues are being published for distribution during the preparatory stocktaking meeting in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, currently taking place through to 6 December 2017. 

The first issue, Global Migration Trends, provides a brief overview of key global migration trends, based on available statistics and estimates from a variety of sources, to support informed decision-making throughout a global compact for migration process. The document summarizes key facts and figures on a range of migration-related topics, covering the period January 2015–December 2016, and cites more recent figures when available.

Although this Data Bulletin is by no means exhaustive, it presents a broad picture of the state of migration around the world. A more detailed report on global migration trends will be published by IOM’s GMDAC in December 2017.

More Than Numbers: The Value of Migration Data is the second issue in the series. Produced by IOM’s GMDAC with analytic support from McKinsey & Company, this Data Bulletin makes the case that there is significant value in migration which can be better leveraged by identifying and making targeted investments in data. It outlines a framework to prioritize data needs and investments, and points to potential next steps at the global, regional and national levels.

A full report will be released in January 2018, detailing a vision for how data can enable value capture in migration.

The third issue of the Data Bulletin, Measuring Migration Governance, describes strategies for understanding and enhancing national migration policies and governance structures. By providing a clear overview of selected indices of migration policies, this issue of the Data Bulletin series aims to give policymakers the information and tools to assess and improve on migration governance, which has become increasingly important in the context of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

The Migration Governance Indicators (MGI), developed by IOM and the Economist Intelligence Unit in 2015–2016, are examples of these tools. They are applied in full consultation with national authorities to measure good migration governance through a comprehensive framework covering six main policy domains.

The MGIs help countries assess the extent to which their migration policy is comprehensive, thereby identifying best practices and areas in need of further development. The MGIs can also help countries develop baseline assessments and conduct future reviews of their work to assess progress in the context of the SDGs and the Global Compact for Migration.

The six policy domains are based on IOM’s Migration Governance Framework (MiGOF).

For more information on the MGI and MiGOF please see https://gmdac.iom.int/migration-governance-indicators and http://www.iom.int/multilateral-processes.  

The Data Bulletin: Informing a Global Compact for Migration will continue to focus on providing policymakers with the information and analysis required for evidence-based decision making. Future issues will be published and distributed, notably at key events related to a global compact for migration process throughout 2018.

For more information please contact:

IOM's Global Migration Data Analysis Centre (GMDAC), Tel.: +49 30 278 778 11, Email: www.gmdac.iom.int

Denis Kierans, IOM GMDAC, dkierans@iom.int

Marzia Rango, IOM GMDAC, mrango@iom.int

Abdel Rahmane Diop, IOM Global Compact for Migration Team, ardiop@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, December 5, 2017 - 15:24Image: Region-Country: GermanyThemes: Global CompactGlobal Compact on MigrationMigration ResearchDefault: Multimedia: 

The first issue, “Global Migration Trends,” provides an overview of key global migration trends, based on available statistics and estimates from a variety of sources. Photo: Amanda Nero / UN Migration Agency (IOM)

IOM’s Global Migration Data Analysis Centre aims to summarize the existing evidence on migration in an accurate and accessible fashion. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM)

Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

Mobile Medical Units Reach Over 1,200 Migrants, Refugees in Greece in 2 Months

IOM - News - Mar, 12/05/2017 - 08:43

Athens – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, and partner Médecins du Monde (MdM) announced today (5 December) that together they have rapidly provided primary health care services to over 1,200 migrants and refugees on the Greek mainland. The services were provided via mobile medical units during a two-month period between September and October 2017. 

The medical teams also conducted over 3,400 primary health care consultations – an average of almost 80 daily – since the EU-funded project began in September. Consultations cover examinations, prescriptions of medicines and referrals to other facilities for secondary care in three open-accommodation facilities in Greece. 

Gianluca Rocco, IOM Greece Chief of Mission, explained that thousands of migrants and refugees currently living in Greece face health issues that require immediate care. However, they often face difficulties in accessing the National Health System outside the accommodation facilities where they reside.

"The medical assistance is very much needed,” Rocco said. “Improving the health of migrants and refugees is a fundamental step in helping them begin to rebuild their lives.”

“We are collaborating closely with MdM in Greece and supporting the Greek Government and authorities to alleviate suffering, protect human dignity and safeguard the human right to health,” he added.

IOM and MdM also are working closely to ensure a smooth transition and handover of health services to the Greek Government from 2018, and they welcome the integration of migrants and refugees into the national healthcare system.

“We are very satisfied with our cooperation with the International Organization for Migration and the European Commission,” said Christos Dimopoulos, Protection and Integration Projects Manager of Médecins du Monde in Greece.

“Through this project, we have been able to provide needed health care services to vulnerable migrants and refugees while also moving towards handing over their health coverage to the National Health System,” Dimopoulos explained.

The mobile medical units are comprised of general practitioners, pediatricians, dentists, nurses, interpreters and drivers who provide primary healthcare services five days per week in morning and afternoon shifts. They work in open centres in Thermopylae, Serres and Oinofyta.

The units conduct health consultations and provide primary health care services for minor medical issues such as viral infections, colds and injuries. They also prescribe medicine and monitor people with chronic illnesses such as heart diseases, diabetes, respiratory problems and gynecological health problems.

For people in need of secondary health care, MdM medical units facilitate referrals to hospitals by organizing appointments, and by providing transportation and escorts where possible. 

"Health care is essential for refugees and asylum seekers in Greece, as it is for every person,” said Evangelos Petratos, the European Commission's Humanitarian Expert in Greece. “For this reason, the European Commission supports its humanitarian partners in the country in their efforts to provide them with primary health assistance.”

“We are glad to see the achievements so far and the good cooperation between our partners and the Greek health authorities,” he continued. 

The joint IOM - MdM project is funded by the European Commission. 

For more information please contact Christine Nikolaidou at IOM Greece, Email: cnikolaidou@iom.int, Tel: +30 210 99 19 040 ext. 248;

Nikolaos Kallakos at MdM Greece, Email: info@mdmgreece.gr, Tel: +30 210 32 36 224;

Carlos Martin Ruiz de Gordejuela at the European Commission, Email: carlos.martin@ec.europa.eu, Tel. +32 22 96 53 22, Mobile: +32 46 07 91 716

Daniel Puglisi, Email: daniel.puglisi@ec.europa.eu, Tel. +32 22 96 91 40, Mobile: +32 46 07 67 374

Language English Posted: Tuesday, December 5, 2017 - 15:23Image: Region-Country: GreeceThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMigration HealthDefault: Multimedia: 

Migrant child receives a vaccination before school enrollment. Photo: Médecins du Monde 2017

Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

Mobile Medical Units Reach Over 1,200 Migrants, Refugees in Greece in 2 Months

IOM - News - Mar, 12/05/2017 - 08:43

Athens – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, and partner Médecins du Monde (MdM) announced today (5 December) that together they have rapidly provided primary health care services to over 1,200 migrants and refugees on the Greek mainland. The services were provided via mobile medical units during a two-month period between September and October 2017. 

The medical teams also conducted over 3,400 primary health care consultations – an average of almost 80 daily – since the EU-funded project began in September. Consultations cover examinations, prescriptions of medicines and referrals to other facilities for secondary care in three open-accommodation facilities in Greece. 

Gianluca Rocco, IOM Greece Chief of Mission, explained that thousands of migrants and refugees currently living in Greece face health issues that require immediate care. However, they often face difficulties in accessing the National Health System outside the accommodation facilities where they reside.

"The medical assistance is very much needed,” Rocco said. “Improving the health of migrants and refugees is a fundamental step in helping them begin to rebuild their lives.”

“We are collaborating closely with MdM in Greece and supporting the Greek Government and authorities to alleviate suffering, protect human dignity and safeguard the human right to health,” he added.

IOM and MdM also are working closely to ensure a smooth transition and handover of health services to the Greek Government from 2018, and they welcome the integration of migrants and refugees into the national healthcare system.

“We are very satisfied with our cooperation with the International Organization for Migration and the European Commission,” said Christos Dimopoulos, Protection and Integration Projects Manager of Médecins du Monde in Greece.

“Through this project, we have been able to provide needed health care services to vulnerable migrants and refugees while also moving towards handing over their health coverage to the National Health System,” Dimopoulos explained.

The mobile medical units are comprised of general practitioners, pediatricians, dentists, nurses, interpreters and drivers who provide primary healthcare services five days per week in morning and afternoon shifts. They work in open centres in Thermopylae, Serres and Oinofyta.

The units conduct health consultations and provide primary health care services for minor medical issues such as viral infections, colds and injuries. They also prescribe medicine and monitor people with chronic illnesses such as heart diseases, diabetes, respiratory problems and gynecological health problems.

For people in need of secondary health care, MdM medical units facilitate referrals to hospitals by organizing appointments, and by providing transportation and escorts where possible. 

"Health care is essential for refugees and asylum seekers in Greece, as it is for every person,” said Evangelos Petratos, the European Commission's Humanitarian Expert in Greece. “For this reason, the European Commission supports its humanitarian partners in the country in their efforts to provide them with primary health assistance.”

“We are glad to see the achievements so far and the good cooperation between our partners and the Greek health authorities,” he continued. 

The joint IOM - MdM project is funded by the European Commission. 

For more information please contact Christine Nikolaidou at IOM Greece, Email: cnikolaidou@iom.int, Tel: +30 210 99 19 040 ext. 248;

Nikolaos Kallakos at MdM Greece, Email: info@mdmgreece.gr, Tel: +30 210 32 36 224;

Carlos Martin Ruiz de Gordejuela at the European Commission, Email: carlos.martin@ec.europa.eu, Tel. +32 22 96 53 22, Mobile: +32 46 07 91 716

Daniel Puglisi, Email: daniel.puglisi@ec.europa.eu, Tel. +32 22 96 91 40, Mobile: +32 46 07 67 374

Language English Posted: Tuesday, December 5, 2017 - 15:23Image: Region-Country: GreeceThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMigration HealthDefault: Multimedia: 

Migrant child receives a vaccination before school enrollment. Photo: Médecins du Monde 2017

Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM