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IOM, ICIMOD Renew Ongoing Collaboration on Labour Migration, Remittances, Climate Change and Disaster Risk Reduction

IOM - News - Ven, 11/03/2017 - 10:41

Kathmandu – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, and the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) have renewed an agreement to collaborate in the areas of labour migration, remittances and climate change, and expanded their collaboration to include disaster risk reduction in the Hindu Kush Himalaya region.

The six-year Memorandum of Understanding signed today (3/11) in Kathmandu by IOM Nepal Chief of Mission Paul Norton and ICIMOD Director General David Molden follows an earlier agreement signed in November 2014. 

It ensures that IOM and ICIMOD will continue to work together through capacity building and awareness-raising to share information and develop migration management tools.

The agreement highlights the importance of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the efforts that the two organizations will make to complement and promote the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, while forging a closer partnership in areas of shared interest.

 “One billion people are on the move today, which is more than at any other time in recorded history. Forces driving such large scale of migration include climate change, natural and man-made catastrophes, conflict, demographic trends of an ageing industrialized population, jobless youth population in the developing world and widening economic disparities,” said IOM Nepal Chief of Mission Paul Norton.

 “IOM is committed to addressing the links between migration, environment and climate change on all fronts – research, policy and operational – and, at all levels – global, regional and national,” he said, noting that IOM is a member of the Taskforce on Displacement under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and is implementing the Sendai Framework and the SDGs, as well as playing a leading role in the development of the Global Compact on Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration.

“IOM will continue to work towards mainstreaming human mobility, disaster risk reduction and climate change in diverse areas, building collaboration and breaking down silos,” he added.

ICIMOD Director General Dr. David Molden said, “Policymakers in Hindu Kush Himalayan countries should seek ways to mainstream human mobility into national processes associated with the SDGs, the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, and the UNFCCC. ICIMOD will continue to work closely with its regional member countries to facilitate exchange of good practices to govern mobility and help countries to harness opportunities arising out of human mobility.”

There are nearly 250 million international migrants, and some 750 million domestic migrants. In other words, there are a billion migrants among the world’s seven billion people. One in every seven people on the globe is a migrant. In Nepal, over half of all households now have at least one migrant family member currently abroad or living in Nepal as a returnee. Nepal ranks 23rd among the world’s remittance-receiving countries; in terms of the contribution of remittances to GDP, it ranks third after Tajikistan and the Kyrgyz Republic.

For more information, please contact Paul I. Norton at IOM Nepal, Tel: +97714426250, Email: iomnepal@iom.int. Or Sudina Shakya, ICIMOD, Tel: +97715003222, Email: Sudina.Shakya@icimod.org

Language English Posted: Friday, November 3, 2017 - 17:33Image: Region-Country: NepalThemes: IOMMigration and Climate ChangeMigration and EnvironmentDefault: Multimedia: 

ICIMOD Director General Dr. David Molden (left) and IOM Nepal Chief of Mission Paul Norton sign the six-year memorandum of understanding in the areas of labour migration, remittances and climate change, and expanded their collaboration to include disaster risk reduction in the Hindu Kush Himalaya region. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

Rohingya Entry Continues in Cox’s Bazar; at Least 2,000 New Arrivals Overnight

IOM - News - Ven, 11/03/2017 - 10:40

Cox’s Bazar - Over the last 48 hours some 4,000 Rohingya refugees crossed into Bangladesh from Myanmar at the Anjumanpara border crossing point. Traumatized, hungry and fearing for their lives, the refugees had camped out in the open in an area of no-man’s land between the two countries. They crossed at low tide where they were met by Bangladeshi border guards.

Early Thursday morning, the refugees, many of them vulnerable women and children who had been walking for days crossed into Bangladesh’s Cox’s Bazar district assisted by the border authorities. Some 1,400 crossed to a transit area to be registered.

The refugees are fleeing the violence, which has convulsed their communities in Northern Rakhine State since late August. The refugees join over 820,000 already living in some safety in Cox’s Bazar, where over 607,000 have arrived since 25 August.

Overnight, a further 2,000 fleeing Rohingya reached the crossing point and were assisted by the Bangladeshi authorities. They were being assisted by local authorities and medical services, including vaccinations, were being provided, along with screening by humanitarian organizations for those refugees judged to be extremely vulnerable so that they could receive timely specialized assistance.

The UN Migration Agency, IOM runs a reception area at Balukhali in the Bangladeshi city of Cox’s Bazar. There, emergency assistance was being provided in cooperation with Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), the UN Population Fund (UNFPA), and UNWOMEN along with various local volunteer organizations and members of the local community.

Upon entering Balukhali, the refugees received emergency shelter materials, dignity kits, sandbags to support self-settlement and mitigate the impact of heavy rainfall and flash flooding as well as to create retaining walls meant to reduce the risk of landslides. The IOM site development unit had already prepared this zone for the relocation of refugees from high density areas.

“Most people I talked to have walked for eight to ten days, getting to the border,” said IOM press officer Olivia Headon, “where they have waited up to four days to cross. They said they had nothing to eat or drink after the first few days.”

She added some arrivals expressed their desire to find family members who had already crossed into Bangladesh, where first responders from various humanitarian agencies provided food and water.

Several Rohingya explained they had hoped to leave Myanmar sooner, but had to wait to harvest and sell their grain to raise funds for their journey, Headon explained. “One man told me he had to pay someone to carry his elderly mother.”

Others continue to arrive in the southern Cox’s Bazar district. On Wednesday a group of 42 traveling by boat – mostly women and children – capsized. Four persons including a minor perished, having been caught by the boat propeller and died from their injuries and drowning.

IOM, the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) and other responding organizations are actively working with to improve living conditions in existing settlements and advocating for alternative solutions to accommodate the influx of refugees.

For more information, please contact IOM Cox’s Bazar:

Olivia Headon, Tel: +8801733335221, Email: oheadon@iom.int
Shirin Akhter, Tel: +8801711187499, Email: sakhter@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, November 3, 2017 - 17:34Image: Region-Country: BangladeshThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesRefugee and Asylum IssuesDefault: Multimedia: 

Rohingya refugees crossed into Bangladesh from Myanmar at the Anjumanpara border crossing point. Photo: Olivia Headon / UN Migration Agency 2017

Rohingya refugees crossed into Bangladesh from Myanmar at the Anjumanpara border crossing point. Photo: Olivia Headon / UN Migration Agency 2017

Rohingya refugees crossed into Bangladesh from Myanmar at the Anjumanpara border crossing point. Photo: Olivia Headon / UN Migration Agency 2017

Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

UN Migration Agency Provides Medical Care to Newly Displaced Persons from West Anbar

IOM - News - Gio, 11/02/2017 - 02:26

West Anbar – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, medical teams are providing assistance to nearly 1,000 primary health care beneficiaries, including displaced persons, returnees and host communities, per week in Anbar Governorate.

In anticipation of military operations, and due to recent military operations in remaining ISIL held areas, more than 6,800 individuals (over 1,100 households) have been displaced from west Anbar between the 12­–31 October, mostly from the districts of al-Kai’m and Rau’a. Since January 2017, nearly 64,750 individuals have been displaced by military operations in West Anbar. Of these, more than 18,000 have been displaced since 20 September following the intensification of the Iraqi Forces’ offensive against ISIL in the west Anbar districts of Ana, Al Ka’im and Ru’a.

IOM staff spoke with Noriah, a mother of seven children recently displaced from Al-Qaim, at an IOM mobile medical team clinic. “We have been displaced because of the very bad situation and the lack of food. Our lives used to be normal. After ISIL entered the city, my children stopped studying and our lives became very difficult. We got to a stage at which I could not always afford to feed my children,” said Noriah.

“We decided to move at night; we borrowed money from our relatives to pay the smugglers. We fled only in the clothes that we were wearing. We walked with other families who were also trying to get out of the city. Our journey lasted for three days via the Trabeal road and then to Kilo 160 until we reached the camp of Amiriyat Fallujah.”

IOM medical teams provide primary health care consultations, obstetric and gynecological consultations, and referral of emergency cases. The most common ailments reported include upper respiratory tract infections, diarrhea, leishmaniasis, scabies and chronic diseases, including hypertension and diabetes. Some trauma patients present injuries sustained during the conflict. IOM medical teams are also providing awareness raising sessions on prevention of communicable diseases and good health practices.

The locations for the mobile medical teams are determined according to the needs of the population and in coordination with Anbar’s Department of Health. Current locations include Amriyat Al-Falluja, Falluja, Heet, Kubbaissa, and two locations in Garma. These medical services are life saving for many newly displaced people who suffer from health conditions that were complicated by insufficient access to health assistance in ISIL-held areas.

In addition, IOM medical teams are running a tuberculosis response and prevention project in several governorates, funded by the Global Fund. In Anbar, this project provides support to the National Tuberculosis Programme centres in Anbar; conducts screening for suspected cases and awareness sessions on tuberculosis symptoms and prevention; follow-ups on tuberculosis patients and provides them with transportation and high-protein foods; as well as training sessions for staff members of Anbar’s Department of Health.

IOM Iraq Displacement Tracking Matrix has been monitoring the West Anbar crisis since January 2017, when significant displacement movements were already taking place due to hostilities in the area and in anticipation of major military operations. Of the total displaced, 42,600 are registered in camps, and more than 22,100 are in out-of-camp locations (over 21,500 in private settings, and 570 in critical shelter arrangements, including unfinished buildings). The majority of the displaced from West Anbar are within Anbar Governorate; more than 28,400 have been displaced to the district of Falluja, and over 2,800 to Ramadi. Others have fled to Baghdad governorate (over 4,100) and Erbil governorate (4,300).

West Anbar displacement data can be found at: http://iomiraq.net/article/0/west-anbar-crisis-displacement-overview-31-...

Iraq displacement data can be accessed at: http://iraqdtm.iom.int  

Click here to read Zahraa’s story of displacement: https://medium.com/@UNmigration/hope-during-displacement-b344c8fd9e12

For more information, please contact Sandra Black at IOM Iraq, Tel: +964 751 234 2550, Email: sblack@iom.int

Language English Posted: Thursday, November 2, 2017 - 09:24Image: Region-Country: IraqDefault: Multimedia: 

42,600 displaced Iraqis are registered in camps, and more than 22,100 are in out-of-camp locations. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

Four Die, Survivors in Critical Condition as Boat Carrying 40 Rohingya Refugees Capsizes

IOM - News - Mar, 10/31/2017 - 14:41

Cox’s Bazar - Around 2.00 am last night (30/10), approximately 40 Rohingya refugees left Gorgondia, Myanmar, for Bangladesh on a small fishing boat. Early this morning (31/10) around 8.00 am, the boat capsized off Baillakhali Sea Point in Jaliapalong Union, Ukhiya sub-district. It had just crossed the Bangladesh border and was trying to reach Shamlapur in Teknaf sub-district. They were 10 kilometres away from their destination.

Four refugees died in the tragedy, while 36 people were rescued by the local community - local authorities, members of local Union Parishad, fire service, police and local people, including fishermen. The remains of four people were recovered - one woman and three children, including Juhora Begum, a 60-year-old woman, Monira, a four and a half-year-old girl, Anamul Hasan, a 6-year-old boy, and another ten-year-old boy. The boy’s body was buried on the beach by people living nearby.

IOM, the UN Migration Agency, learned of the incident immediately and deployed a mobile medical team of a doctor and a nurse with two ambulances. The team checked all the survivors. Five were referred to Cox’s Bazar General Hospital, two to the Ukhiya Upazila Health Complex, four to the MOAS Hospital in Shamlapur, and two to the IOM Centre at the Baharchara Family Welfare Clinic.

IOM spoke to two of the survivors at the government-run Upazila Health Complex, which is supported by IOM.

 "There were 40 people on the boat - 19 women and seven men, the rest were children. The weather deteriorated early in the morning and the boat capsized. We did not have enough money to make the journey on foot. So, with relatives living abroad, we arranged for a boat to take us across the border [into Bangladesh]. I have lost one child and my mother-in-law,” said a woman, whose one-year-old daughter is in critical condition and having difficulty breathing.

"When the boat capsized, I fell into the water and lost hold of my child. After a few seconds, a man helped me get her back…. When we were rescued, the doctors found that my baby was near death and an ambulance took us to this hospital,” she added. Her husband also survived, but at the time of the interview was arranging the burial of their other child, who survived the crossing, but died on arrival at the IOM-supported clinic at Shamlapur.

Gulbahar, a woman in her late twenties, was also in poor condition, having swallowed sea water. “When the boat came close to Bangladesh coast, two or three people jumped off when they saw land. The boat then lost balance in the stormy weather and capsized. As soon as that happened, I was in the water and didn’t know where my children were. A man grabbed my hair and pulled me up from the sea and suddenly I could breath again. Everyone in the boat was carrying all the valuables they owned – they were all lost," she said, still gasping for breath. 

But her whole family – her husband and three children – survived. "We were freezing. Some people gave us blankets and then the doctors arrived to help,” she said. Two of her children are now with her in the Ukhiya Upazila Health Complex and her husband is with the other child in another hospital. 

IOM doctor Raisul Islam, who was the first IOM doctor on the scene, said that scene on the beach was deeply distressing. “They were sitting on the beach under a plastic sheet. The dead body of a child was laid out nearby. It was freezing cold and people were coughing. I checked everyone to see who was most urgently in need of medical care and identified two patients - a child and a woman – who were in critical condition. I travelled here with them in one of the ambulances.”

“The other ambulance brought other survivors in need of treatment to other health facilities, including the IOM-supported clinic in Shamlapur. Some families were split up and brought to different facilities based on their condition. Once the patients are stable, we will be able to reunite the families - hopefully, this afternoon.”

 

For more information, please contact IOM Cox’s Bazar: 

Olivia Headon, Tel: +8801733335221, Email: oheadon@iom.int  

Shirin Akhter, Tel: +8801711187499, Email: sakhter@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, October 31, 2017 - 14:27Image: Region-Country: BangladeshDefault: Multimedia: 

Caption for the photo: Survivor of today's Rohingya refugee boat capsize off the coast of Bangladesh, with her one year old daughter, who is in critical condition, in Ukhiya Upazila Health Complex. Photo: Olivia Headon/UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

IOM nurse Rubel Hossain examines a child survivor on the beach. Photo: Doctor Raisul Islam/UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

Clean Water, Sanitation Vast Challenges as Bangladesh Copes with 607,000 New Refugees

IOM - News - Mar, 10/31/2017 - 10:04

Cox’s Bazar - Since 25 August, over 607,000 Rohingya refugees have crossed the border into Bangladesh from Myanmar.

Although the number of new arrivals is now slowing, people continue to arrive in the makeshift settlements of Cox’s Bazar every day, bringing the total Rohingya population of the district to over 820,000.

 The settlements are dangerously congested and overcrowded and the pressure on sources of clean drinking water and basic sanitation are enormous. Having walked for days without water and food, the refugees arrive to the settlements exhausted and thirsty. Many are ill.

 “All of the spontaneous and makeshift sites where the Rohingya have sought shelter are in urgent need of water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) support to prevent diseases and to restore basic human dignity,” says IOM WASH expert Antonio Torres. "Existing WASH facilities are not yet sufficient to cope with this number of people,” he notes.

The Inter Sector Coordination Group (ISCG), which coordinates the work of aid agencies in Cox’s Bazar and is hosted by IOM, estimates that of 750,000 people initially targeted for WASH assistance, some 530,000 have now been reached. The UN Humanitarian Response Plan estimates that over the next six months, some 1.166 million people in the Cox’s Bazar settlements and host communities will need WASH assistance.

IOM, the UN Migration Agency, is providing vital WASH services to both the Rohingya and the communities hosting them, while scaling up its work to meet the needs of new arrivals.

In total, some 100,000 people already directly benefit from IOM’s WASH activities in the makeshift settlements. Since early September, it has constructed around 785 latrines for the refugees. It has also constructed 14 wells with hand pumps providing over 14,000 people with clean drinking water. It also puts in place systems to manage and maintain the facilities.

Before the crisis, IOM installed a total of 241 hand pump wells and 1,882 latrines in the settlements. All the wells have to be drilled by hand as the terrain is too inaccessible to bring in machinery. The wells have to be drilled to depths of over 150 meters to reach aquifers free of contamination.

IOM also operates and maintains water treatment and supply systems that provide the refugees with over 240,000 liters of safe drinking water every day. It has also trucked in over 741,000 liters of drinking water to remote settlements.

In addition it has built small dams and reservoirs to ensure that sites with limited access to groundwater have enough clean water to make it through the upcoming dry season.

Although, many thousands of refugees now have access to water and sanitation, far more remains to be done to prevent disease outbreaks. Poor road access and insufficient drainage in the displacement sites also make it difficult to reach new arrivals with the urgent support and services they need, including WASH.

For more information, please contact Olivia Headon at IOM Cox's Bazar, Tel: +8801733335221, Email: oheadon@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, October 31, 2017 - 16:51Image: Region-Country: BangladeshThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesRefugee and Asylum IssuesDefault: Multimedia: 

IOM has drilled 14 hand pump wells in Cox’s Bazar settlements since August 25th. They provide some 14,000 people with clean water. File photo: Muse Mohammed / UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

UN Migration Agency, ILO, UNDP Host Training to Include Migration in National and Local Policies

IOM - News - Mar, 10/31/2017 - 10:02

Turin – Over 40 participants from 16 nationalities are attending training on Mainstreaming Migration into Policy Planning from 30 October to 3 November. The training takes place under the auspices of the ILO International Training Centre in Turin.

The five-day course will combine lectures and discussions, case studies, open space debates, role play exercises, networking and group work. It aims to provide a space for dialogue and knowledge sharing among government officials, practitioners, representatives of workers’ and employers’ organizations, and members of international development agencies.

“Mainstreaming Migration into Policy Planning” is an innovative concept, which recognizes the complex nature of migration and its relationship with a broad range of policies relating to development. Integrating migration into development and other governance policies is a proven mechanism for achieving policy coherence. The event gathers representatives of national and local authorities from all regions to promote exchanges on how to achieve such policy coherence, not only across different sectors, but also between both levels of government.

The event is divided into four building blocks that will enable participants to learn more about the nature of the link between migration and development, the mainstreaming processes, as well as engage in networking activities to exchange their experiences with peers. Participants will also join interactive activities where they will analyse the mainstreaming process in fictional countries.

“What we are doing in this academy is crucial for us to understand how to work towards having migration governance frameworks in countries that ensure migration governance is linked to and aligned with the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs),” said Cecile Riallant, IOM Senior Migration and Development Specialist and one of the training’s facilitators. “Indeed, migration affects and is affected by all areas of governance and thus its good governance is a key success factor for the achievement of all the SDGs,” she added.

The training builds on the momentum from the inclusion of migration-specific and migration-relevant goals and targets in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, as well as other global processes such as the Addis Ababa Action Agenda on Financing for Development.

This training takes place within the context of the second phase of the Mainstreaming Migration into National Development Strategies programme, a joint effort between IOM and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) which is funded by the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC).

For more information, please contact Jorge Galindo at IOM HQ, Tel: +41227179205, Email: jgalindo@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, October 31, 2017 - 16:50Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandThemes: Capacity BuildingDefault: Multimedia: 

 The training offered a participatory environment where attendees from 16 different nationalities shared views and experiences. Photo: Agnes Farge 2017

 The training offered a participatory environment where attendees from 16 different nationalities shared views and experiences. Photo: Agnes Farge 2017

 The training offered a participatory environment where attendees from 16 different nationalities shared views and experiences. Photo: Agnes Farge 2017

Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

Workshop Helps Roll Out Integrated Border Management Training Package in Zimbabwe

IOM - News - Mar, 10/31/2017 - 10:01

Masvingo – On 24–27 October, IOM, the UN Migration Agency, in close cooperation with the Ministry of Home Affairs of Zimbabwe, the African Capacity Building Centre (ACBC) and the IOM Regional Office in Pretoria, organized a three-day national sensitization and pilot capacity building workshop on integrated border management (IBM) in Masvingo, Zimbabwe.

The workshop brought together government officials from various border management agencies, and provided participants with methods, tools and approaches to roll out the Integrated Border Management training package. This package was developed in 2017 by the Ministry of Home Affairs and Regional Immigration officers of Zimbabwe.

In addition to empowering the trainers to share knowledge and skills on border management in the country, the workshops also sought to achieve other objectives, including to increase the capacity of border management officers to facilitate IBM concepts in migration management and to further their knowledge of international border management and improve the understanding of immigration officers’ functions in an IBM structure.

The workshops were facilitated by Marcellino Ramkishun, Senior Migration Management Specialist at the ACBC; Elizabeth Warn, IOM Regional Thematic Specialist (IBM) in Pretoria; and Memory Mwale, IOM Zimbabwe Project Officer.

“The IBM Training Package is a culmination of processes and initiatives which included the scoping mission and border assessments which were conducted in 2016,” said Melusi Matshiya, Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Home Affairs. “The module alone cannot bring desired IBM results, it needs a collective and integrated approach by all border management stakeholders,” added Matshiya.

“IOM focuses on various aspects of technical assistance, including capacity building in migration and border management, policy and procedural development to ensure inter-agency and cross-border harmonization of procedure, as well as facilitation of inter-agency and cross-border working groups to enhance sharing of information,” said Lily Sanya, IOM Zimbabwe Chief of Mission who confirmed IOM’s firm commitment to support government on integrated border management.

“With IBM in place, migrants should cross borders easily and quickly. There is need for collaboration among countries to monitor the movements of goods and people at the borders. Countries need to (eventually) provide a rapid joint response to the massive flow of migrants due to natural disasters or economic and political crises that lead to migration,” said Ramkishun.

The outcome of the workshop was increased overall capacity of the department of immigration and other ministries on the dynamics of modern migration management. The workshop also embedded IBM’s integrated approach within the induction training of all border agencies.

The three-day workshop is part of the Promoting Migration Governance in Zimbabwe (PMGZ) project which is funded by the European Union under the 11th European Development Fund and the IOM Development Fund.

For more information, please contact: Memory Mwale at IOM Zimbabwe, Tel: +263 4 704285, Email: mmwale@iom.int; Marcellino Ramkishun at the IOM African Capacity Building Centre,Tel: +255272753488, Email: mramkishun@iom.int; or Elizabeth Warn, IOM Regional Office in Pretoria, Tel: +27123422789, Email: ewarn@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, October 31, 2017 - 16:49Image: Region-Country: ZimbabweThemes: Capacity BuildingIntegrated Border ManagementDefault: Multimedia: 

Massimo Stella, EU Programme Manager, Lily Sanya, IOM Zimbabwe Chief of Mission and Melusi Matshiya, Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Home Affairs. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Marcellino Ramkishun, Senior Migration Management Specialist at ACBC facilitating a session during the workshop. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Border Agencies and migration sector ministries participating in the IBM workshop. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017  

Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 149,785 in 2017; Deaths Reach 2,826

IOM - News - Mar, 10/31/2017 - 09:57

Geneva – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, reports that 149,785 migrants and refugees entered Europe by sea in 2017 through 29 October, with about 75 per cent arriving in Italy and the remainder divided between Greece, Cyprus and Spain. This compares with 334,914 arrivals across the region through the same period last year.

IOM Rome reported Monday (30/10) that official figures from Italy’s Ministry of the Interior indicate a total of 111,302 migrants have arrived in Italy by sea this year – a drop in annual totals from this time last year by more than 30 per cent.

Reviewing total arrivals through June 2017, IOM researchers have determined that this year began as the busiest of the past four years of this Central Mediterranean migration emergency, with 83,752 arrivals – a total some 20 per cent higher than either of the previous two half-years (January-June, 2015 and 2016) when each year around 70,000 migrants arrived from North Africa to Italy. (See chart below.)

But over the past four months that trend had reversed. During the 2017 months of July-October, IOM has calculated arrivals to Italy fell to 27,550 – well under a third of 2016’s total for those same four months (89,205) well under half of 2015’s total on the Central Mediterranean route (70,658).

 

The sharp drop-off in arrivals cannot be explained either by IOM’s increasing efforts to repatriate African migrants from Libya this year – a total of 12,456 men, women and children through 29 October – or by the 18,835 migrants rescued so far this year in Libyan waters. Those two totals combined come to just over 31,000 individuals, or roughly half the 61,655 difference between 2016’s totals for the late summer-early fall period and 2017’s comparable figures.

IOM Geneva spokesman Joel Millman made this observation concerning these latest numbers: “We notice two things straight away. One is that the wide presence of rescue vessels across this Central Mediterranean these past four months did not serve, as some predicted, as a ‘pull factor’ drawing ever increasing numbers of migrants towards Europe from Africa. The second point: fatalities along this route, traditionally the region’s most deadly season, also have dropped sharply during the summer of 2017.”

IOM’s Missing Migrants Project recorded that from July through October 2015, some 1,622 migrants and refugees died crossing the Mediterranean. In 2016 that total fell to 1,093. This year, through 29 October 2017, the total is 567.

Deaths, while down, have not stopped. On Sunday (29 October), a boat carrying 51 people capsized off the coast of Tangiers, Morocco, in the Western Mediterranean. Two migrants lost their lives and a rescue operation was underway Monday to search for those who remain missing. These deaths bring total Mediterranean fatalities in 2017 to 2,826.

“For now, local NGOs have confirmed only two deaths from this incident in the Western Mediterranean,” said Marta Sanchez in the Missing Migrants Project’s Berlin offices. “The boat was carrying 51 people (including 10 women and two babies). Several survivors, including one pregnant woman, were taken to the hospital suffering from severe fuel burns. The Moroccan Navy was coordinating a search for three migrants who remain missing.”

Worldwide, IOM’s Missing Migrants Project (MMP) has recorded the deaths of 4,842 people migrating in 2017 through 29 October. 

In North Africa, the deaths of six migrants were recorded on 21 October, on a motorway between Tangiers and Asilah, Morocco, separately from the boat carrying 51 people that capsized off Tangiers on 29 October.
Missing Migrants Project data are compiled by IOM staff but come from a variety of sources, some of which are unofficial. To learn more about how data on missing migrants are collected, click here.

 

Latest Mediterranean Update infographic: http://migration.iom.int/docs/MMP/171031_Mediterranean_Update.pdf

For latest arrivals and fatalities in the Mediterranean, please visit: http://migration.iom.int/europe
Learn more about the Missing Migrants Project at: http://missingmigrants.iom.int

For more information, please contact:
Joel Millman at IOM HQ, Tel: +41 79 103 8720, Email: jmillman@iom.int
Flavio Di Giacomo, IOM Italy, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int
Kelly Namia, IOM Greece, Tel: +30 210 991 2174, Email: knamia@iom.int
Julia Black, IOM GMDAC, Tel: +49 30 278 778 27, Email: jblack@iom.int
Christine Petré, IOM Libya, Tel: +216 29 240 448, Email: chpetre@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, October 31, 2017 - 16:47Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMissing MigrantsRefugee and Asylum IssuesDefault: Multimedia:  Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

UN Migration Agency: Senegal Improves Border Management Practices

IOM - News - Mar, 10/31/2017 - 09:52

Dakar - Management in Senegal project is holding today (31/10) its closing ceremony in Dakar, Senegal. The ceremony brings together representatives from the European Union, Senegalese authorities and international cooperation partners, such as the French, Spanish and Italian Embassies. 

Based on the national strategy on border management developed in 2013, the Senegalese Government and the European Union agreed on strengthening border security and management, enhancing cooperation and developing border control and surveillance. The main objectives of the project were the facilitation of the lawful movement of people and goods, while tackling trans-border crimes along the Senegalese border with Mauritania and Mali.

During the 38-month project, many objectives have been reached, thanks to a permanent collaboration between IOM, the UN Migration Agency, the European Union and Senegalese authorities.

“Integrated Border Management (IBM) is more than a simple concept; it is a culture, which requires time to be assimilated. The results achieved during this project in Senegal show the positive attitude of the Senegalese authorities toward IBM,” said Massimo Ramanzin, IOM Senegal project coordination.

“The success obtained during the implementation of the project demonstrates the continuous and methodical development of the Senegalese authorities in border control and surveillance. Furthermore, the border communities’ participation in border security and management is, and will be, essential and complementary to a successful development,” he added.

Along the borders that Senegal shares with Mauritania and Mali, eight joint border crossing points (BCPs) for police and customs were built, and one joint border crossing point was renovated. These BCPs were equipped with furniture, solar panels and technical equipment. During the project, more than 250 border security officials were trained on border control and surveillance, including the detection of forged documents.

The Senegalese security forces tasked with surveillance and control received new mobility and technical equipment: 13 4x4 pick-up vehicles; 12 motorcycles; 6 speedboats; 30 digital night-vision goggles; 30 docu-boxes; endoscopes; magnifying lenses and UV lamps. At the same time, sensitizing campaigns addressed to border communities were offered by theatre groups, through sketches in local languages.

More than 1,350 people were sensitized during the activities at BCPs. Moreover, several hundred people across the villages along the border were reached by the sensitization campaigns through itinerant caravans, TV spots and radio messages.  

This pilot project, funded by the EU and implemented by IOM Senegal, started in September 2014 and targeted the border with Mauritania and a portion of the border with Mali. The main objective has been to enhance integrated border management, to facilitate the free movement of people and goods, and to enforce national security.

“The EU and the Senegalese Government remain committed in continuing their cooperation in strengthening border security through further actions that will interest the Senegalese borders with Guinea Conakry, Guinea Bissau and Gambia. We are hoping that IOM will be a part of this as well,” said Amadou Deme, Permanent Secretary of the Project Steering Committee.

For more information, please contact Massimo Ramanzin at IOM Senegal, Tel: + 221 33 869 62 00, E-mail: mramanzin@iom.int  

Language English Posted: Tuesday, October 31, 2017 - 16:46Image: Region-Country: SenegalThemes: Community StabilizationIntegrated Border ManagementDefault: Multimedia: 

Theatre groups perform sensitizing campaigns to border communities through sketches in local languages. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

Two Months on from Outbreak of Violence, Number of Rohingya Refugees in Bangladesh Reaches 817,000

IOM - News - Ven, 10/27/2017 - 11:32

Cox’s Bazar – A total of 817,000 Rohingya refugees are now living in the southern most district of Bangladesh. Since 25 August, some 604,000 people have crossed the border, having fled violence in Myanmar. This is in addition to the over 200,000 people who had sought safety in Cox’s Bazar following previous outbreaks of violence. The majority of new arrivals live in crowded makeshift settlements, with only 46,000 people living among the host community.

IOM, the UN Migration Agency, has been meeting with male and female community leaders in the rapidly growing Kutupalong refugee settlement to assess how best to address residents’ needs and ensure that they know where they can provide feedback and complaints, and who they can come to if they need to report gender-based violence.

Following this meeting, the communities in Kutupalong are now more engaged in the tracking of new arrivals to the settlement. Community meetings will now be held regularly.

IOM and REACH, a non-governmental organization (NGO) working to facilitate the development of information tools and products that enhance the humanitarian community’s decision-making and planning capacity, are mapping community leadership in all sites to enable communities to have more of a say and decision-making power in the humanitarian response in their settlements.

Rohingya refugees arrive with little or no possessions and no means of building a shelter to live in and protect themselves from weather stresses. IOM and partners have been working for over two months to ensure that these immediate needs are met. IOM has distributed over 80,000 kits that provided nearly 395,000 families with the necessities to build their own shelter, giving them a place to sleep and stay out of the hot sun and, at times, torrential rains.

With so many people having settled in such a small area, site planning and management is vital for the protection of Rohingya refugees. IOM is working with partners and the Government of Bangladesh to ensure access to displacement sites, all of which developed on hilly terrain, which is extremely difficult to reach with services.

More focus must be given on building roads and basic infrastructure such as drains and stairways to make sure that the refugee population can receive services as quickly and effectively as possible. For example, 741,000 litres of water have been trucked into the settlements with limited access to water, especially in locations where this often has to be hand-carried up steep hills to bring it close to the elderly and children, who might not otherwise get access to it.

Medical needs in the camps are extremely high, especially considering that many of the refugees would have walked long distances to reach Bangladesh, with many having experienced physical and sexual abuse along the way and are now living in over-crowded sites that were not prepared for inhabitation by more than 800,000 people. IOM health teams have provided emergency and primary healthcare services to 53,000 patients. The team has also set up child delivery facilities and a patient stabilization unit in Kutupalong.

To address sanitation needs and prevent disease outbreaks, IOM has constructed 660 emergency pit latrines and 100 mobile toilets. Twelve deep tube wells have been completed to provide settlement residents with clean drinking water.

Meeting urgent protection needs is crucial to the wellbeing and safety of the most vulnerable Rohingya refugees. Women and children remain most at risk and require specialist care and attention. IOM is responding and working to prevent to gender-based violence and human trafficking.

The includes the construction of safe spaces, which are centres in Leda, Balukali, Kutupalong, and Shamlapur settlements, where women can meet, rather than staying alone in a tiny shelter all day. IOM has also provided over 2,000 people with psychological first aid.

The protection team has referred 1,000 people to health services for specialist care services. Over 2,100 dignity kits, which includes underwear, menstrual hygiene products, soap, toothbrushes and other small items intended to help restore women's dignity and increase their mobility during crisis situations, and 3,000 solar lanterns have been distributed to vulnerable women.

For more information, please contact Olivia Headon at Cox's Bazar, Tel: +8801733335221, Email: oheadon@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, October 27, 2017 - 17:30Image: Region-Country: BangladeshThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesRefugee and Asylum IssuesDefault: Multimedia: 

Children collect water at an IOM-built well in Kutupalong Rohingya Refugee Settlement, Bangladesh. Photo: Olivia Headon / UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

A woman collects water at an IOM-built well in Kutupalong Rohingya Refugee Settlement, Bangladesh. Photo: Olivia Headon / UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

PLURAL+ 2017 Award Winners to be Honoured at the United Nations in New York

IOM - News - Ven, 10/27/2017 - 11:31

New York – On 9 November, young film makers from around the world will be honoured at the 2017 PLURAL+ Youth Video Festival and Awards. The ceremony will be hosted at the United Nations Headquarters in New York by Ahmed Badr, a young artist, published author, photographer and poet.

PLURAL+ is an annual Youth Video Festival on migration, diversity and social inclusion. It emphasizes intercultural dialogue, youth expression and the desire for peace and better understanding worldwide. It is a joint initiative of the United Nations Alliance of Civilizations (UNAOC) and IOM, the UN Migration Agency, supported by partner organizations from around the world.

This year’s three International Jury winners were selected from more than 320 videos submitted from 67 countries worldwide.

The winning videos are Eliminate Hate, Eliminate Borders by Adrian Vega (Mexico) in the up to 12 years old category, which was produced by a class of hearing- and speech-impaired students in Mexico City with help from their teacher. The video encourages countries to build bridges, not walls.

Aibek by Aisha Salimgereyeva (Kazakhstan) in the 13-17 years old category was created by a group of young Kazakhstani filmmakers about a boy who struggles to come to terms with his sexuality in a society that does not accept him for who he is.

Child of All Nations by Hariz Ghifari (Indonesia), winner of the 18-25 years old category, depicts the experiences of a West Papuan teenager who moves to Yogyakarta, a metropolitan Indonesian city. Faced with discrimination and exclusion, he is forced to reassess his identity as to what it means to be a West Papuan, Indonesian and a citizen of the world.

This year sees the introduction of the new PLURAL+ Award for the Prevention of Xenophobia which has been awarded to The True Impact, produced by Babar Ali and Sarah Randolph. As part of a series of workshops in Nepal organized by the International Youth Media Summit, Ali and Randolph, the film invites the viewer to reflect on the fundamental impact that violence has on individuals and on humanity as a whole.

Videos receiving PLURAL+ partner awards will also be celebrated. The winning videos are from:  Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Brazil, Canada, Finland, India, Indonesia, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Mexico, Nepal, New Zealand, Pakistan, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Spain, South Africa, Syria, Turkey, UK and USA. Many of the video makers will attend the ceremony in New York.

On 10 November, there will be three panel discussions with PLURAL+ winners in partnership with UNICEF/Voices of Youth and the Ghetto Film School at the Paley Center for Media in New York. Young media makers will discuss on migration, diversity, and social inclusion.

The award ceremony on 9 November is open to the public, and will take place at 6.30pm in Conference Room 4 at the United Nations Headquarters. Those who are interested to attend must register and RSVP.

For more information on the PLURAL+ Youth Video Festival, to register and to access the UN premises to attend, please visit www.pluralplus.unaoc.org 

For more information, please contact Rahma Soliman, IOM NY, Tel: +1 (212) 681 7000, Email: rsoliman@iom.int, and Jordi Torrent, UNAOC, Tel: +1 (929) 274-6217, Email: jordit@unops.org

Language English Posted: Friday, October 27, 2017 - 17:29Image: Region-Country: United States of AmericaThemes: IOMMigration and YouthDefault: Multimedia: 

The Filmmakers of Child of All Nations in Indonesia who won the age category 18-25. Photo: Courtesy of Child of All Nations 2017

Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

UN Migration Agency, UNDP Improve Access to Clean Water for 45,000 Displaced Somalis in Baidoa

IOM - News - Ven, 10/27/2017 - 09:13

Baidoa – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, is partnering with the Government of Somalia and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) to provide greater access to clean water for over 45,000 internally displaced persons (IDPs) and host communities in the south-western state of Baidoa affected by drought. The project is part of ongoing water, sanitation and hygiene activities and drought response work being carried out by IOM and UNDP in the area.

Somalia’s Gu (April–June) rainy season was significantly below average this year, creating severe drought across all regions. Baidoa town has been one of the most affected areas, and currently holds one of the highest numbers of IDPs in Somalia. According to IOM's Displacement Tracking Matrix, across 21 sites, there are over 243,000 people who have migrated to the area between November 2016 and September 2017. Absorption capacities in Baidoa have already been severely overstretched, hugely increasing the demand for life-saving services and leading to deteriorating living conditions in the IDP settlements and host communities.
In line with the Federal Government’s priorities, the Somali National Development Plan and the hygiene and sanitation cluster’s objectives, the aim of this joint IOM-UNDP project is to provide sustainable water supply services to displaced and disaster vulnerable women, girls, boys and men in IDP settlements and host communities in Baidoa town. Strategic boreholes will be rehabilitated to provide access to safe and clean water to areas affected by drought. The project also includes the construction of water tanks and delivery of water by trucks.

“Providing clean water for the IDPs and host communities is one of the Ministry’s main priorities, especially as it contributes towards the prevention of waterborne diseases in the region,” said Aden Hassan Mohamed, Minister of Energy and Water Resources of the South West State. “We are very excited to receive additional support from UNDP and IOM,” he added.

Abdirahim Nor, UNDP Climate Resilience Programme Specialist, said UNDP is committed to supporting drought-affected people and poor urban communities in Baidoa town and surrounding villages, while also building resilience to climatic-induced droughts in Somalia by increasing access to clean water.

“Such droughts not only trigger a humanitarian catastrophe but are a major impediment to development in Somalia. The losses are enormous in the form of lives and livelihoods. UNDP is providing support to Baidoa through IOM to ensure we are able to provide access to reliable sources of water for IDPs and vulnerable communities,” Nor said.

“Access to water is a major challenge not only for the displaced persons but also for the whole community living in Baidoa and surrounding areas,” said Omar Khayre, IOM’s Hygiene and Sanitation Programme Manager. “As the population in Baidoa has almost increased by 40 to 50 per cent, the current water supply cannot meet the needs. The project will contribute towards covering the critical immediate needs as well as train officials on how to maintain, repair and manage water sources.”
From January to September 2017, IOM has provided an emergency supply of over 180 million litres of clean and safe water to 568,749 beneficiaries across its target regions through a water voucher mechanism. An estimated 385,958 people have been provided with sustainable access to water through operational and maintenance support of 46 permanent water sources, including strategic boreholes and shallow wells. IOM is also conducting hygiene promotion among at-risk communities, having reached an estimated 563,777 people with behavioural change messages between January and September 2017.
For more information, please contact: Yuko Tomita at IOM Somalia, Tel: + 254 715 990 600, Email: iomsomaliapsu@iom.int or Hassan Abdirizak Ahmed at UNDP Somalia, Email: hassan.a.ahmed@undp.org

Language English Posted: Friday, October 27, 2017 - 14:54Image: Region-Country: SomaliaThemes: Community StabilizationHumanitarian EmergenciesInternally Displaced PersonsDefault: Multimedia: 

Somalia’s Ministry of Water and Energy in the South West has identified 11 strategic boreholes that will be rehabilitated to provide access to safe and clean water to areas affected by drought and AWD/cholera in Baidoa. Photo: Hasan Ahmed Hared / UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Representatives from local authorities, IOM and UNDP met in Baidoa on Wednesday 25 October 2017 to launch the project. Photo: Hasan Ahmed Hared / UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 149,159 in 2017; Deaths Reach 2,824

IOM - News - Ven, 10/27/2017 - 09:12

Geneva – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, reports that 149,159 migrants and refugees entered Europe by sea in 2017 through 25 October, with about 75 per cent arriving in Italy and the remainder divided between Greece, Cyprus and Spain. This compares with 332,326 arrivals across the region through the same period last year.

IOM Rome reported Thursday (26/10) that official figures from Italy’s Ministry of the Interior indicate a total of 111,240 migrants have arrived in Italy by sea this year – a drop in annual totals from this time last year by nearly 30 per cent.

IOM Athens’ Kelly Namia reported Thursday of one incident occurring off the island of Kos that required a search and rescue operation. The Hellenic Coast Guard rescued 25 migrants and transferred them to that island.
Nearly 12,000 men, women and children have entered Greece by sea from waters of the Eastern Mediterranean since 1 August, or more migrants than have entered during all of 2017’s first seven months.

Namia further reported that 198 migrants or refugees entered Greece by sea in three days from 22-24 October, bringing migrant sea arrivals to Greek territory to 3,385 with a week left in October, and 23,059 for the year so far. (See chart below.)

Moreover, Turkish authorities this week reported new data on apprehensions of migrants at sea occurring in Turkish waters. IOM Turkey’s Abby Dwommoh reported that Coast Guard officials have intercepted over 3,400 migrants during the month of September, turning them back to land. They intercepted just over 2,600 in August – for a total of some 6,000 migrants during these two late summer months. For the year, through the first nine months, Turkish authorities have intercepted 15,470 migrants along their shores.

“In some cases, rescued persons may continue to try to cross and some, we know, do make it to Greece. However, not all do,” explained Dwommoh. “Following rescue, Syrians (the largest group crossing) are registered in Turkey before they are ‘let free.’ With non-Syrians, the Turkish Coast Guard generally takes them to removal centres, unless the migrant has claimed asylum.”

IOM Libya’s Christine Petré reported Thursday (26 October) that between 7 and 24 October, 430 men, women and children were intercepted in Libyan waters – and the remains of 37 victims retrieved.  Of those rescued, 48 were children.
So far this year, IOM Libya reports 18,835 migrants have been rescued/intercepted in Libyan waters, with over 10,000 brought back to land since 1 June. (See chart below.)

Worldwide, IOM’s Missing Migrants Project (MMP) has recorded the deaths of 4,826 people migrating in 2017 through 26 October – an increase of just over 400 since 3 October, the month’s first MMP update shared with media, when IOM reported worldwide fatalities of 4,425. That means over the last 23 days, an average of just over 17 migrants have perished every 24 hours.

That’s one more migrant death per day than the year’s average determined by dividing 4,826 migrants killed or missing since 1 January with 296 days so far in 2017. “It’s important to note that, despite nearly 1,000 fewer deaths on the Mediterranean compared with last year – and a steep drop off in fatal shipwrecks since early summer – migrants still are dying by the dozens every week,” said Joel Millman, an IOM spokesman in Geneva. “Not just those coming to Europe, but within Europe, and across Southeast Asia, Africa and the Americas.”

IOM’s MMP update for the Central Mediterranean includes the remains of 37 people recovered off Libya in recent weeks: 28 bodies retrieved near Al-Khums on 13 October; one body found in Al Maya on 19 October; the remains of eight victims found near Al Khums on 22 October.

In the Western Mediterranean, one North African man died on 26 October when he fell from a truck he was riding precariously as the vehicle was boarding a ferry bound for mainland Spain via the Port of Melilla. These deaths bring total fatalities in the Mediterranean region to 2,824 in 2017 – compared with 3,810 deaths recorded at this point in 2016.

In Central America, this week, the death of a Honduran migrant was recorded on 22 October, after a train accident in southern Mexico. Additionally, the remains of a 45-year-old migrant from the Dominican Republic were found inside a boat near Rincón, Puerto Rico on 22 October.

On the US/Mexico border, MMP added newly received, cumulative data issued by the Webb County, Texas, Office of the Medical Examiner on human remains found across several border counties this year. So far in 2017, 316 bodies have been found on the US-Mexico border, 58 on Mexico’s side, and 258 bodies – or nearly one per day – recovered north of the border, mainly in Texas and Arizona. 

Missing Migrants Project data are compiled by IOM staff but come from a variety of sources, some of which are unofficial. To learn more about how data on missing migrants are collected, click here.

Latest Mediterranean Update infographic: http://migration.iom.int/docs/MMP/171027_Mediterranean_Update.pdf
For latest arrivals and fatalities in the Mediterranean, please visit: http://migration.iom.int/europe
Learn more about the Missing Migrants Project at: http://missingmigrants.iom.int

For more information, please contact:
Joel Millman at IOM HQ, Tel: +41 79 103 8720, Email: jmillman@iom.int
Mircea Mocanu, IOM Romania, Tel:  +40212115657, Email: mmocanu@iom.int
Dimitrios Tsagalas, IOM Cyprus, Tel: + 22 77 22 70, E-mail: dtsagalas@iom.int
Flavio Di Giacomo, IOM Italy, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int
Kelly Namia, IOM Greece, Tel: +30 210 991 2174, Email: knamia@iom.int
Julia Black, IOM GMDAC, Tel: +49 30 278 778 27, Email: jblack@iom.int
Abby Dwommoh, IOM Turkey, Tel: +90 312 454 3048, Email: MediaIOMTurkey@iom.int
Christine Petré, IOM Libya, Tel: +216 29 240 448, Email: chpetre@iom.int
Ana Dodevska, IOM Spain, Tel: +34 91 445 7116, Email: adodevska@iom.int
Myriam Chabbi, IOM Tunisia, Mobile: +216 28 78 78 05, Tel: +216 71 860 312 ext 109, Email: mchabbi@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, October 27, 2017 - 14:53Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMissing MigrantsDefault: Multimedia:  Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

UN Migration Agency Helps 49 Malians, Guineans and Central Africans Return Home

IOM - News - Ven, 10/27/2017 - 09:10

Central African Republic – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, has organized the voluntary transportation of seven Malians, eight Guineans and 34 Central Africans from Bangassou, Central African Republic (CAR).

The relocation of the Malians and Guineans has been taking place this week from Bangassou to Bangui, and next week from Bangui to their country of origin, in coordination with the Malian Consulate in Douala, the Guinean Embassy in Libreville, IOM Mali, IOM Guinea, UNHCR CAR and other partners. The 34 internally displaced CAR nationals will also be voluntarily transported to their places of origin, including Bangui, Bambari and Obo.

The Malian beneficiaries represent a single household of seven individuals, including a year-old girl. The head of the household, Dramé Mahamat, is from the Kayes region, and came to CAR in 1985. The Malians will leave the province of Bangui on Monday 30 October 2017 and will arrive in Mali late afternoon the same day. The family will be assisted by IOM Mali at the airport and will receive USD 150 per individual for secondary transportation costs. Three nights of hotel accommodation will also be provided for the household if necessary, while they wait for their secondary transportation.

IOM is collecting data on all beneficiaries, as well as working with several partners. The World Food Programme (WFP) is providing food assistance, UNICEF is providing hygiene and sanitation facilities through the Catholic charity, Caritas, and Doctors Without Borders (MSF) is providing medical assistance.

CAR is experiencing a resurgence of violence and faces the risk of a repeat of the devastating crisis that beset the country four years ago. The south-eastern city of Bangassou witnessed violent community conflict in May 2017 with attacks of Anti-Balaka militants against the Muslim community. The situation continues to remain unstable despite the presence of the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in the Central African Republic (MINUSCA).

Among the hundreds of thousands affected by the escalating situation in the country, 423 displaced Muslim households (1,500 individuals) have been given protection by a Catholic bishop in Bangassou. Bishop Juan José Aguirre Munoz, has been providing refuge to them after fighting broke out in May. They have since been under the care of the church, humanitarian organizations and the protection of MINUSCA.

Regarding the situation of the rest of the displaced population, Jean François Aguilera, IOM CAR Chief of Mission, said, “No options have yet to be agreed upon for the majority of the households in the IDP camp. We are, however, very pleased to facilitate the voluntary return of these households so far.”
For more information, please contact Jean-François Aguilera at IOM Bangui, Tel: + 236 72 18 7635, Email: jfaguilera@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, October 27, 2017 - 14:52Image: Region-Country: Central African RepublicThemes: Internally Displaced PersonsDefault: Multimedia: 

423 displaced Muslim households have been given protection in a Catholic church in Bangassou. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

1,500 displaced Muslims, including women and children, have been under the care of the church, humanitarian organizations and the protection of MINUSCA since May 2017 in Bangassou. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

Australia’s Governor-General Visits Pre-Departure Orientation Session in Lebanon

IOM - News - Ven, 10/27/2017 - 09:06

Beirut – On 24 October, the Australian Cultural Orientation Program (AUSCO) and IOM, the UN Migration Agency, welcomed Sir Peter Cosgrove, the Governor General of the Commonwealth of Australia, and Lady Cosgrove to a pre-departure orientation class in Beirut, Lebanon.

Welcomed by Fawzi Al-Zioud, IOM Lebanon Chief of Mission, the Cosgroves were provided with an insight into training delivered by staff in Lebanon to refugee and humanitarian visa holders, including orientation on Australian culture, laws and values.

AUSCO aims to prepare visa holders for travel, create realistic expectations about life in Australia and enhance settlement prospects.

Jamal Al-Fakhouri, IOM AUSCO regional programme manager, briefed them about the AUSCO programme. Al-Fakhouri stated that from 2014 to 2017, 26,485 beneficiaries travelled to Australia, having completed an AUSCO training, most of them coming from the Middle East. “From January to September 2017, 1,046 beneficiaries have participated in AUSCO in IOM Beirut; 495 males and 551 females,” said Al-Fakhouri.

Al-Fakhouri also shared information about the link between IOM/AUSCO and the training that refugees receive upon arrival in Australia. He explained that there is a constant exchange of information and communication in an annual offshore/on-shore training between AUSCO trainers and the service providers in Australia, which allows better management of the programme. When asked about the AUSCO curriculum, he mentioned that although the curriculum is the same, different methodologies are being used to adapt to the different needs of refugees depending on their region of origin.

The Governor-General also attended an AUSCO training class. “One day, this child might have a chance to become a prime minister in Australia,” he said, referring to an eight-year-old participant.

Funded by the Australian Government's Department of Social Services, AUSCO is delivered by IOM in five regions, including Africa, South Asia, South East Asia, Latin America, the Middle East and North Africa.

Of the 8,906 participants in the Middle East, 2,507 have attended training in Lebanon.

For more information please contact Constanze Voelkel-Hutchison in IOM Bangkok, Mobile: +66 62 595 1046 Email: cvoelkel@iom.int. Or Jamal Al-Fakhouri in IOM Amman, Tel: +962 7 7570 0770, Email: jalfakhouri@iom.int

Language English Posted: Friday, October 27, 2017 - 14:51Image: Region-Country: BangladeshThemes: ResettlementDefault: Multimedia: 

Governor General of the Commonwealth of Australia Sir Peter Cosgrove (center) together with participants of the Australian Cultural Orientation Program (AUSCO) and UN Migration Agency's (IOM) pre-departure orientation class in Beirut, Lebanon. Photo: UN Migration Agency / Wissam Oueiss 2017

Governor General of the Commonwealth of Australia Sir Peter Cosgrove (center) speaks to participants of the Australian Cultural Orientation Program (AUSCO) and UN Migration Agency's (IOM) pre-departure orientation class in Beirut, Lebanon. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

IOM Turkey Marks Fifth Year of Supporting People Fleeing Conflict

IOM - News - Gio, 10/26/2017 - 05:13

Turkey -  IOM, the UN Migration agency, is marking its fifth year of providing assistance to migrants and refugees in Turkey and internally displaced persons (IDPs) in northern Syria.  Over two million people - migrants, refugees and IDPs - have received help so far.

After years of regional conflict, millions of people fleeing violence do not have access to necessities or services like food, shelter and education.  Each month, hundreds of migrants and refugees continue to risk everything as they take desperate journeys to build a better life. 

“Having a family, providing for your loved ones, educating your children, living in peace.  These are the basic foundations on which we build our lives, but for millions of people affected by the Syrian conflict, this is an untenable reality,” said IOM Turkey Chief of Mission, Lado Gvilava.

In September alone, over 190,000 people were displaced inside Syria, bringing the total number of IDPs to just under six million.  Another 3.3 million Syrians have fled to neighbouring Turkey which hosts the world’s largest refugee population. Since 2015, over a million migrants and refugees have arrived on Greece’s shores from Turkey and nearly 150,000 have been rescued by the Turkish Coast Guard. 

IOM Turkey’s assistance programmes for migrants, refugees and IDPs initially focused on meeting the immediate needs of those fleeing the conflict.  As the crisis continued, IOM scaled up its programming to focus on protection and resilience support to Syrians and host communities, as well as providing protection services and basic needs for migrants and refugees rescued at sea. 

“IOM’s help has given us some time to breathe and my family to find work,” said Hiba, a Syrian refugee living in Turkey.

With over one million migrants and refugees assisted inside Turkey and another million people assisted in northern Syria, IOM Turkey continues to provide basic needs, education, food security, protection, livelihoods and health services. 

Watch the commemoration video.
Read "Rebuilding a Future" 

For further information. please contact Abby Dwommoh, IOM Turkey, Tel: +90 312 454 3048, Email: MediaIOMTurkey@iom.int.  

Language English Posted: Thursday, October 26, 2017 - 11:01Image: Region-Country: TurkeyThemes: IOMDefault: Multimedia: 

IOM colleagues conduct a non-food items (NFI) distribution to Syrian refugee households in Hatay. Photo: Muse Mohammed / UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2016

Hundreds of Syrian women and children line up to receive a hot meal at one of the food kitchens supported by IOM in Gaziantep, Turkey. Across the city, 6,000 people are fed daily through three IOM supported food kitchens. Photo: Muse Mohammed / UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2016

Children refugees from Syria prepare for classes at the Syrian Social Gathering (SSG), a multi-service center supported by IOM. Photo: Muse Mohammed / UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2016

Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

UN Migration Agency Delivers Hygiene Kits to Rohingya Refugees in Bangladesh

IOM - News - Mar, 10/24/2017 - 10:22

Cox’s Bazar – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, is distributing hygiene kits to the most vulnerable of hundreds of thousands of people who have fled violence in Myanmar’s North Rakhine State for the relative safety of the vast refugee settlements that now cover the Cox’s Bazar district of southern Bangladesh.

The kits, which include soap, toothbrushes, water containers, hygienic cloths, menstrual hygiene products, undergarments, antiseptic liquid and other small personal items, are funded by the United Nations’ Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF).

“These kits ensure that Rohingya families – particularly women and children – can at least meet their personal care and hygiene needs as they face the harsh reality of life in the makeshift settlements,” said IOM Bangladesh Chief of Mission Sarat Dash.

An estimated 603,000 refugees have arrived in Cox’s Bazar since August, joining some 200,000 others already sheltering in the settlements. Most of the new arrivals come with nothing but the clothes on their back, often having walked for days without food or water. Many have experienced devastating physical and emotional trauma.

To date, IOM has distributed 6,626 hygiene kits to the most vulnerable families, reaching an estimated 33,130 people.

The kits are part of a USD 5 million CERF contribution to fund IOM shelter, health, water, sanitation and hygiene operations in Cox’s Bazar.

“CERF funding has been critical to saving lives in this humanitarian crisis. It has allowed us to scale up and respond to the escalating needs of Rohingya refugees in Cox’s Bazar in a very short timeframe,” said Dash.

Yesterday (23/10) 35 international donors met in Geneva to announce pledges of USD 345 million to urgently ramp up the delivery of critical humanitarian assistance to Rohingya refugees and host communities in Bangladesh over the next six months. The pledging conference was co-hosted by the European and Kuwait and co-organised by UNOCHA, IOM and UNHCR.

The pledges, which include money already committed, cover nearly 80 percent of the USD 434 million appealed for in the UN Joint Response Plan published earlier this month. The plan aims to meet the basic needs of 1.2 million newly arrived and existing refugees, and their Bangladeshi hosts in Cox’s Bazar through February 2018.

“Without these vital funds, humanitarian agencies will not be able to continue to provide protection and life-saving aid to one of the most vulnerable groups in the world. We welcome these pledges, but I hope that the end of this conference does not mean the end of new funding commitments. We have not reached our target and each percentage point we are under means thousands are left without food, healthcare and shelter,” said IOM Director General William Lacy Swing, speaking after the pledging conference.

IOM is appealing for USD 120 million to meet the needs of the most vulnerable Rohingya and the Bangladeshi communities hosting them over the next six months. You can find out more about the appeal here.

For more information, please contact Abdusattor Esoev at IOM Dhaka, Tel: + 88 02 550 448 1113, Email: aesoev@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, October 24, 2017 - 16:15Image: Region-Country: BangladeshDefault: Multimedia: 

The UN Migration Agency distributes hygiene kits to families living in Cox’s Bazar temporary settlement camps. Photo: Muse Mohammed / UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

UN Migration, Refugee Agencies Help 134 Somali Refugees Get Home from Yemen

IOM - News - Mar, 10/24/2017 - 10:21

Yemen – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, in coordination with UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, has organized the transportation of 134 Somalis refugees, 73 adults (40 men and 33 women) and 61 children (29 boys and 32 girls), home to Somalia from war-torn Yemen. The boat carrying the refugees left the port of Aden yesterday (23/10) and will arrive today (24/10) at the Somali port of Berbera. After 20 hours of travel across the Arabian sea, the group will be met by IOM and UNHCR staff to assist their onward journey home.

These Somalis came to Yemen searching for a better life and found themselves caught up in conflict and often subjected to abuse by smugglers. Among the group returning home are families, who had been living in Khares refugee camp and others, who had been living in the city of Aden. Prior to departure, IOM doctors ensured that all were fit for travel and UNHCR provided them with a cash package to assist their reintegration once they arrive home.

Qasim Mohammed, who has been in Yemen for 25 years, said, as he was getting ready to leave the UNHCR shelter to go to the port, “I am very happy to return home with the assistance of IOM, I have been looking for such a chance for so many years but there was no safe way to go, only with smugglers, but now this is a golden opportunity for me and my five children.”

This is the third assisted spontaneous return of Somalis organized by IOM in partnership with UNHCR under an initiative, which began in September this year. This project is implemented by IOM and UNHCR in close coordination with regional and local authorities in Somalia, Somaliland and Yemen. The returns from Yemen to Somalia are made possible through a USD 4.41 million project funded by the United States Department of State Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration.
Since November 2016, IOM has organized a total of 16 voluntary returns with the first 12 being supported by the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia through the King Salman Center for Humanitarian Aid and Relief. So far, IOM has helped some 1,845 Somalis get home from Yemen.

“We are so happy that we are able to help these people get home,” said Laurent de Boeck, IOM Yemen Chief of Mission. “It is such a great sight to see the refugees enter the boat, smiling at the thought of rebuilding their lives.”

For more information, please contact
Rabih Sarieddine, IOM Aden, Tel: +967 736 088 839, Email rsarieddine@iom.int
Saba Malme, IOM Sana’a, Tel: + 967 736 800 329, Email: smalme@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, October 24, 2017 - 16:14Image: Region-Country: YemenThemes: Assisted Voluntary Return and ReintegrationHumanitarian EmergenciesDefault: Multimedia:  Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 148,882 in 2017; Deaths Reach 2,783

IOM - News - Mar, 10/24/2017 - 10:13

Geneva – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, reports that 148,882 migrants and refugees entered Europe by sea in 2017 through 22 October, with over 75 per cent arriving in Italy and the remainder divided between Greece, Cyprus and Spain. This compares with 324,267 arrivals across the region through the same period last year.

IOM Rome reported Monday (23/10) that official figures from Italy’s Ministry of the Interior indicate a total of 111,166 migrants have arrived in Italy by sea this year, 25 per cent fewer than by this same time last year. Italian authorities also disclosed arrivals of 1,286 Tunisians during the month of September this year, or just a few dozen fewer than the 1,357 Tunisians arriving during 2017’s previous eight months (1 January – 31 August, 2017).

According to IOM estimates, 1,500 Tunisians have arrived on Italian shores so far in October, bringing to over 4,100 this year’s total for Tunisian arrivals.  Through all of 2016 a total of 1,207 irregular migrants from Tunisia arrived in Italy by sea, or less than a third of this year’s totals through almost 10 months.

IOM Tunis' Myriam Chabbi reported Monday the overwhelming majority of those leaving Tunisia on this emerging route are Tunisian nationals, not those Sub-Saharan Africans, or Bangladeshi or Moroccans commonly associated with the Libyan smuggling route. "According to the data available, she said, "from 9 October to date, five rescue operations took place, with a total of 121 migrants. Only one was not a [Tunisian] national."

IOM Tunisia noted that Tunisia’s government is taking migration seriously with the inclusion of the national migration strategy in the national development plan 2016-2020.

Among Tunisia's push-factors: lack of access to education, health care, employment. Also, a growing fatigue with prospects for political reform now six years after the start of the Arab Spring, in the country where the regional upheavals began. Another contributor: Tunisia's long tradition of sending its best and brightest north as migrants, especially to Italy and France. "Europe has always been the Promised Land to vulnerable classes," she explained. "Every mother dreams that her daughter marries a 'Zmegri' (migrant). So, now, here come the smugglers! In every popular coffee shop, every neighborhood, there is someone selling the dream."

IOM’s Flavio Di Giacomo reported on Monday on new government figures on the top ten nationalities arriving in Italy via the Central Mediterranean route linking Libya to Europe.  Nigeria remains the single largest sender, with just over 17,000 registered arrivals through the end of September. That’s some 10,000 fewer than the number arriving last year through the same month.

Guinea, Bangladesh and Cote d’Ivoire were listed as the second, third, and fourth largest sending countries, respectively, all recording slightly more arrivals than had come through the first nine months of 2016. Mali, Eritrea, Gambia, Senegal and Sudan were the next largest senders, with all recording fewer arrivals than during the same period last year. Eritrea, like Nigeria, recorded around 10,000 fewer arrivals than came in 2016, and about 30,000 fewer than came in 2015.

Morocco, at ninth place, recorded more than two times as many migrants this year than last; Ghana, at tenth place, recorded slightly fewer. (See chart below.)

IOM Athens’ Kelly Namia reported Monday that three events occurred since last Tuesday (17 October) off the islands of Chios and Rhodes requiring search and rescue operations. The Hellenic Coast Guard managed to rescue 99 migrants and transfer them to the respective islands.

Namia further reported that 756 migrants or refugees entered Greece by sea in four days from 18-21 October, bringing migrant sea arrivals to Greek territory to 3,187 through the first three weeks of October, and to 22,861 for the year so far. (See chart below.)

IOM Libya’s Christine Petré reported Monday (23 October) that the remains of a man of African origin were retrieved by locals from the shores of Al Maya, west of Tripoli, on 19 October. On 21 October, the body of one other man, also believed to be African, was found on the shores of Al Khums. The following day (22 October), the remains of seven additional victims were retrieved by the Libyan Red Crescent from the shores of Al Khums. Local fishermen reported that they had spotted at sea the remains of other victims. 

No rescue or interception operations were reported during the period from Friday through Monday.

So far this year, 18,815 migrants have been rescued/intercepted in Libyan waters.

The Malian government with the support of the UN Migration Agency in Bamako welcomed last Friday the voluntary return of 163 Malian migrants who were stranded in Libya. The majority of those Malians returned were between 18 and 40 years old, although there were four minors on the chartered return flight. Several among the returnees were stranded for many years in Libya, while others were determined to make it to Europe.

Abdullah, 30 years old and married with one child, told IOM he arrived in Libya last October, hoping to reach Italy. “I decided to come back to Mali, because of the difficult situation in Libya. I will never forget that I spent so much money on my journey. In our attempt to cross the Mediterranean Sea, we were 137 people in a boat. Twenty-seven of them survived after the boat collapsed. They took the engine of our boat and left us alone in the sea. We spent three days at sea, without support. I saw children and pregnant women who didn’t make it.”

Abdullah explained, after he was rescued: “Libyan police found us and took us to the prison in Griane. I spent eight months in prison, in horrible conditions. Sometimes we didn’t get food, and they beat me every morning. I was released after the payment of ransom by my parents. The embassy of Mali in Libya and IOM helped me to come back to Mali.”

The delegate of Malians Abroad and African Integration Ministry, Salif Sidibe said, “It is very hard to see compatriots who were really in distress in Libya.”

He explained that “All 163 migrants were imprisoned in Libya and were identified at the Embassy of Mali in Libya before arriving safely in Bamako, thanks to IOM's assistance.”

This year alone IOM has conducted four return flights to Mali, with over 600 Malians returning from Libya.

Worldwide, IOM’s Missing Migrants Project (MMP) has recorded the deaths of 4,757 people migrating in 2017.  In the Central Mediterranean, the remains of nine people have been recovered off Libya in the past five days: one body was found in Al Maya on 19 October and eight bodies were retrieved near Al Khums on 21 and 22 October. Additionally, one man drowned yesterday (22 October) off the coast of Melilla, Spain. These deaths bring the total of fatalities in the Mediterranean in 2017 to 2,793.

On the US/Mexico border, one Mexican man drowned in the Río Bravo on 20 October near Eagle Pass, Texas. In Mozambique, 11 Malawians lost their lives and seven were injured in a vehicle accident on 9 October in the district of Tsangano, near the border with Malawi.

Additionally, MMP recorded the deaths of 29 Rohingya who drowned in the Naf River as they tried to cross from Rakhine State, in Myanmar to Bangladesh in several incidents between 31 August and 20 September 2017. Since August 31 of this year, 243 Rohingya have died trying to cross into Bangladesh.

Missing Migrants Project data are compiled by IOM staff but come from a variety of sources, some of which are unofficial. To learn more about how data on missing migrants are collected, click here.

Latest Mediterranean Update infographic: http://migration.iom.int/docs/MMP/171024_Mediterranean_Update.pdf
For latest arrivals and fatalities in the Mediterranean, please visit: http://migration.iom.int/europe
Learn more about the Missing Migrants Project at: http://missingmigrants.iom.int

For more information, please contact:

Joel Millman at IOM HQ, Tel: +41 79 103 8720, Email: jmillman@iom.int
Mircea Mocanu, IOM Romania, Tel:  +40212115657, Email: mmocanu@iom.int
Dimitrios Tsagalas, IOM Cyprus, Tel: + 22 77 22 70, E-mail: dtsagalas@iom.int
Flavio Di Giacomo, IOM Italy, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int
Kelly Namia, IOM Greece, Tel: +30 210 991 2174, Email: knamia@iom.int
Julia Black, IOM GMDAC, Tel: +49 30 278 778 27, Email: jblack@iom.int
Christine Petré, IOM Libya, Tel: +216 29 240 448, Email: chpetre@iom.int
Ana Dodevska, IOM Spain, Tel: +34 91 445 7116, Email: adodevska@iom.int
Seydou Tangara, IOM Mali, Tel :  + 223 76 42 63 59,   Email:  stangara@iom.int
Myriam Chabbi, IOM Tunisia, Tel :  +216 28 78 78 05 (mobile) office: +216 71 860 312 EXT. 109  Email: mchabbi@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, October 24, 2017 - 14:41Image: Region-Country: SwitzerlandThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMissing MigrantsRefugee and Asylum IssuesDefault: Multimedia: 

Migrants and refugees struggle ashore on a Greek beach. Photo: Francesco Malavolta 2016.

Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM

IOM Greece Supports over 2,000 Voluntary Returnees to Reintegrate, Start Businesses Back Home

IOM - News - Mar, 10/24/2017 - 09:11

Athens – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, announced today (24/10) that more than 2,000 migrants who returned home voluntarily from Greece have successfully implemented personalized reintegration plans in their countries of origin over the last 15 months.

The 2,084 beneficiaries who returned home voluntarily from Greece with IOM support between June 2016 and September 2017 put their reintegration assistance to use through a grant of 1,500 euros in in-kind support, provided exclusively or in combination, to set up small businesses or receive medical assistance, education, temporary accommodation, vocational assistance, material assistance, and job placement.

The vast majority of approved reintegration plans were for setting up small businesses (1,953).

Gianluca Rocco, IOM Chief of Mission in Greece, explained that reintegration support is an essential component of IOM’s Assisted Voluntary Return and Reintegration (AVRR) projects because it further strengthens a cooperative, humanitarian approach for people who have decided to return home from Greece.

“Building on the collaboration between Greece and the countries of origin, this reintegration support enhances opportunities for social and economic sustainability, both for returnees and local communities,” he said.

IOM’s social workers and psychologists, working with cultural mediators, conducted 3,671 individual counselling sessions with voluntary returnees, 2,084 of whom were eligible for reintegration assistance.

The main considerations for selecting candidates to be approved for reintegration support are a person’s vulnerability, work experience, and skills that can guarantee the sustainability of the reintegration plan.

“My dream has become a reality. I have not only returned to my home country, but I also have the ability to teach young people. My private coaching school may be an innovation for my city, but for me is something more. It is my new way of life,” says Eliso Basheleishvili from Georgia. Read her story and others here.

The vast majority of voluntarily returning migrants originate from Pakistan (1,184), Georgia (342) and Iraq (173). Some 1,750 beneficiaries were male and 334 were female.

Hassan Hosseini, a voluntary returnee from Afghanistan, decided to invest in a metal workshop in Kabul after his return. He approached his former boss, a metal smith, with whom he had worked before leaving for Europe, to explore an interest in starting a business together. With the assistance of IOM’s offices in Greece and Afghanistan, the plan became reality. Read Hassan’s story here.

IOM global presence makes reintegration assistance available worldwide, and the assistance is based on collaboration between the countries where the plans are being implemented.

IOM in Greece currently works closely with over 25 IOM offices and third countries to enhance tailored reintegration assistance, link it with the needs of the local labour market, and ensure long-term, sustainable reintegration assistance.

IOM’s reintegration assistance is provided under the framework of the EU and Greek government supported programme Implementation of Assisted Voluntary Returns including Reintegration Measures (AVRR) funded by the EU’s Asylum Migration and Integration Fund (AMIF) and by the Greek Ministry of Interior.

The AVRR programme in Greece is open to undocumented third-country nationals, those who no longer want to stay in Greece, asylum seekers who have abandoned their request for international protection, or those whose asylum application has been rejected. Beneficiaries come from both the mainland and the Greek islands.

For more information please contact Christine Nikolaidou, Tel: +30 210 991 9040 ext. 248, Email: cnikolaidou@iom.int or Zoi Vanikioti at IOM Athens, Tel: +30 210 991 9040 ext. 154, Email: zvanikioti@iom.int

Language English Posted: Tuesday, October 24, 2017 - 14:42Image: Region-Country: GreeceThemes: Assisted Voluntary Return and ReintegrationDefault: Multimedia: 

Pharmacist Muhammad Shafi. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM)  2017

Eliso Basheleishvili returned home to Georgia from Greece to set up a private coaching school. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2016

Kazbeg Khanishvili returned from Greece to farm in Georgia. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2016

Hassan Hosseini at his new metal workshop in Kabul after choosing to return home from Greece. Photo: UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Press Release Type: Global
Categorie: Press Room IOM